Home > 1890-1891 Meeting Minutes

1890-1891 Meeting Minutes

MARCH 19, 1890-June 2, 1891

Maryland Historical Society Woman's Literary Club of Baltimore Collection, MS 988, Box 3

 

[1]

The Woman’s Literary Club of Baltimore

Book of Minutes

1st Meeting, March 19th 1890

 

[2] 

1st Meeting, Woman’s College; Aims and Objects of Club; Requisites of Admission; Name; Election of Officers; Election of Executive Committee; Board of Management 

The initial meeting of the Woman’s Literary Club of Baltimore was held on Wednesday afternoon, March 19th/90 at four o’clock in the President’s lecture room of the Woman’s College, the privilege of the room having been kindly extended by Dr. John F. Goucher and Dr. Hopkins president of the college[?s].

There were between thirty and forty ladies present in response to notes of invitation from Miss Hester Crawford Dorsey [Hester Crawford Dorsey Richardson] to those interested in organizing a woman’s literary club in Baltimore--

The meeting was called to order by Miss Dorsey who stated briefly her object in asking the ladies to assemble there. At her request Mrs Fabian Franklin [Christine Ladd-Franklin] then explained, in a few well chosen words, the aims and objects of the proposed association which would be to further greater intellectual development among the women of Baltimore and to promote social relations among those of similar tastes.

Interchange of opinion then followed as to the eligibility for membership in such a club, and it was the popular opinion that those only should belong who had sufficient interest in literature to have devoted some time and thought to original work for either newspapers and magazines or of a more lasting nature.

Letters of advice and congratulations from Mrs Jenny June Croly and Mrs Frank Leslie[1] were read by Miss Dorsey. The appropriate name for the Club was then discussed--many names were suggested including “The Writer’s Club”, “Pen Club”, “Contemporary Women”, “The Nineteenth Century”, “The Literary League”, and “The Sphynx”--no one of

[3]

these was chosen and the matter was laid over. Miss Dorsey was then asked to occupy the chair and the election of officers followed resulting in the unanimous election of Mrs Lawrence Turnbull [Francese Litchfield Turnbull] for President, Miss Hester Crawford Dorsey Vice President, Mrs George Whitelock [Louise Clarkson Whitelock] Secretary and Miss Fabian Franklin Treasurer.

The Executive Committee was then nominated and elected including Mrs Henry Stockbridge Sr, Mrs Mary Spear Tiernan, Mrs Chas.[Charles] W. Lord [Alice Emma Sauerwein Lord], Mrs Henry P. Goddard [Li Goddard] and Miss Bond--Mrs George Whitelock and Miss Bond subsequently declined serving.

The Officers and executive committee were then appointed the Board of Management and authorized to meet together to draw up a Constitution and by-laws for the government of the Club. The meeting then adjourned.

Copied by Eliza Ridgely from Miss Hester Crawford Dorsey’s Minutes of above meeting

[4]

2nd General Meeting--April 22nd 1890

2nd Meeting Albion Hotel; President’s address; Constitution submitted; Amendment of Section 5 of Article 2nd; Discussion on Section 5, Article 4th; Discussion closed; Election of Secretary; Election of 2 members of Executive Committee

The second general meeting of the Woman’s Literary Club of Baltimore was held on Tuesday afternoon April 22nd at four o’clock in a private parlor of the Albion Hotel. Mrs Lawrence Turnbull [Francese Litchfield Turnbull] President of the association opened the meeting with a brief address explaining the “lines upon which we expect to work” and presenting more definitely than had been previously done, the aims and objects of the Club, not the least important of which will be, if I may (quote) Mrs Turnbull’s words, “to encourage exact and noble thinking among our women, hoping to prove that added strength will cultivate larger grace of speech and manner, keener instincts of pure womanliness, a deeper appreciation of the precious opportunities of the home life with a truer comprehension of its responsibilities--a broader and not less loving and believing heart.[”] At the close of the President’s address Mrs Mary Spear Tiernan, Chairman of the Executive Committee, submitted the Constitution which was discussed and voted upon clause by clause--Each section of Articles 1st and 2nd were carried unanimously to the 5th section of Article 2nd when Mrs Henry Stockbridge proposed the amendment that the Secretary be appointed custodian of the official documents of the Club which was voted upon and carried--Article 3rd was adopted without alteration. Sections 1, 2, 3, and 4 of Article 4th were unanimously carried.[2] Objections were taken to Section 5th of Article 4th relating to “the suppression of the liberty of the press." Animated discussion followed the reading of this clause. Miss Henrietta Szold proposed that the word “license” by substituted for “liberty."

[5]

Miss Eliza Ridgely thought it a pity for the organization of women to protest against the press since it has done so much good.

Miss Dorsey [Hester Crawford Dorsey Richardson] suggested that it was not the “press”, but some of its abuses against which we would protest. Mrs Turnbull then stated very clearly that while recognizing the value and good of the press we are opposed to the publicity given to the privacy of the home life.

Miss Miriam Mason [M. P. Mason?] suggested that the proceedings of such an organization which is of a public character could not apply to private life.

The discussion was finally closed by Mrs Henry Stockbridge who proposed the clause by amended to read as follows[:] “No reports of the meetings shall be given to the press without approval of the officers.[”]

The further reading of the Constitution was then postponed and the election of a secretary followed resulting in the unanimous election of Miss Eliza Ridgely to the office. A vote by ballot was then taken for the election of two members to the Executive Committee to supply vacancies--Mrs Alan P. Smith [May (?) Smith] and Miss Emma Brent [Emma Fenwick Brent] were elected.

Miss H.C. Dorsey secretary pro tem.[3], then recorded the names of the ladies who signified their desire to join the Club.

The meeting then adjourned to meet two weeks from that day.

(Taken from Miss H.C. Dorsey’s Minutes by E Ridgely)

[6]             

 

3rd General Meeting April 29th 1890

3rd Meeting Albion Hotel; Articles on “Salon” read

The third general meeting of the Woman’s Literary Club took place on Tuesday April 29(?) in a private parlor of the Albion Hotel--Mrs Turnbull [Francese Litchfield Turnbull] presiding

Articles on the “Salon” were read by Miss Mason [M. P. Mason?] and Mrs Lord [Alice Emma Sauerwein Lord].

Mrs Tiernan [Mary Spear Tiernan] was acting Secretary.

The reading of the Constitution was finished

Adjourned

1st Salon--May 6th 1890.

1st Salon; Altamont Hotel; Paper by Mrs Franklin; Discussion on Socialism; Poem by Mrs Caskin; Music by Miss M. Mason

The first Salon of the Woman’s Literary Club of Baltimore was held on Tuesday, May 6th, at four o’clock, in private parlors of the Altamont Hotel. The meeting was a social one and quite informal. There were about thirty members present who were received by the President and other Officers.

An interesting paper was read by Mrs Franklin [Christine Ladd-Franklin], Treasurer of the Club, on ‘Some objections to Prof. Newcome’s opinion of Bellamy’s “Looking Backward.”’

This article was followed by the discussion of Socialism by Mrs Franklin and Miss Szold [Henrietta Szold], which was both pleasant and instructive.

By the suggestion of the President, the Club was divided into several parties for debate and conversation.

During the afternoon an original humorous poem in the style of Oscar Wilde, on “The Woman of the Period,” was read by Mrs Caskin [Mrs. Theodore Caskin] and received with applause.

Miss Miriam Mason [M. P. Mason?] contributed much to the pleasure of the Salon by two charming piano selections. The meeting adjourned about six o’clock.

Eliza Ridgely

Secretary

[7]

4th General Meeting May 13th 1890

4th Meeting 18 E. Madison St.; Miss Grace’s paper on Salon--Mankind and Makers; Her suggestion; Mrs Graham on Women’s Congress; Mrs Turnbull on Lanier’s “Psalm of the West”; Mrs Collyer on Literary Association of Dubuque

The fourth general meeting of the Woman’s Literary Club of Baltimore took place on Tuesday afternoon May 13th, at four o’clock in the parlors of number 18 East Madison Street. The meeting was called to order by the President, and the minutes of the 1st Salon were read. Miss Grace [Mary F. Grace] read a paper on “The Mankind of the Salon and Salon Makers." Paris was named as the home of the Salon, esprit and repartee as its life, conversation its aim and end, as sense of freedom the great attraction to its members, and exquisite tact and versatility the requisites of its leaders such as Madames Recamier and Rambouillet. Can we not try to make the Salon indigenous to ourselves? Mrs Goddard’s [Li Goddard] paper also on the “Salon” was read by Miss Bailey [Florence Bailey]. The Salon was always presided over by a woman--argument and thought were ever important, music was used--literature, art, fashion, politics discussed and a club room absolutely needed.

A note of congratulation was read from the Woman’s Club of Denver. Mrs Graham [Elizabeth Turner Graham] Vice President of the Women’s Congress(?) invited membership, stated the aim of the association, its dues and privileges. Mrs Turnbull [Francese Litchfield Turnbull] then read a paper on Sidney Lanier’s “Psalm of the West,” citing many beautiful passages, glancing at our national history from chaos through the horsemen, the noble Columbus, and our various wars to our present great prosperity--speaking of the lifting up of the individual Self in man, his intellectual growth through freedom and love, until we see a glimpse of him as he should be--self-possessed yet humble, looking up to God--the Catholic man. Mrs Collyer spoke to the meeting of the Literary Association of Women of Dubuque, Iowa--its methods--is management--its age (founded 1857); after which the Club adjourned.

Eliza Ridgely

Secretary

[8]


2nd Salon--May 20th 1890

2nd Salon Altamont Hotel; Committees; Chairmen; The Brownings of the Lake Poets added; Poem “The Poet’s Answer”, “In the Woods”

The second Salon of the Woman’s Literary Club was held on Tuesday, May 20th, at four o’clock in private parlor of the Altamont Hotel. The order of the proceedings was changed and the meeting called to business. The President suggested that Committees be formed for the coming winter’s work, and formed at once so that the summer’s leisure might be utilized. The plan was adopted and various Committees were named and several Chairmen appointed. By special suggestion, “The Brownings and The Lake Poets” were added to the division of Poetry. Mrs Franklin [Christine Ladd-Franklin] announced to the Club that women had been invited by Johns Hopkins University professor to two geological excursions and to a lecture on geology.

Two original poems were read during the afternoon: “The Poet’s Answer” by Miss Miriam Mason [M. P. Mason?], and “In the Woods” by Mrs Charles W. Lord [Emma Alice Sauerwein Lord]. Mrs Graham [Elizabeth Turner Graham] moved that the Club be adjourned for the summer two weeks from that evening, which was carried. The meeting adjourned, having had about 30 members present.

E. Ridgely

Secretary


Board of Management Meeting--May 23rd 1890.

Board meeting 24 W. Franklin St.; By-Law made on Honorary Members; Rules on strangers not passed; Committees work.

A meeting of the Board of Management took place on Friday May 23rd, at 4.30 o’clock, at 24 West Franklin Street, with 6 members present. Mrs Franklin [Christine Ladd-Franklin] resolved that one By-Law shall read thus: Honorary members shall be made only by invitation of the Executive Committee. Carried. The rules of admission of strangers were not settled and were laid over.

The Secretary was desired to prepare list of Committees for next meeting with Chairmen and members; to give opportunity to change to those who desired to do so, and to invite all not already named to join some Committee.

Adjourned.

Eliza Ridgely

Secretary

[9]


5th General Meeting--May 27th 1890.

5th Meeting Altamont Hotel; New Members announced, read and proposed; Schedule of Summer Work, “Sunrise” read, Sidney Lanier; Some of Lanier’s poems read; Vote of thanks to President; Last literary meeting of season

The fifth meeting of the Woman’s Literary Club took place on Tuesday, May 27th, at 4 o’clock, in private parlors of the Altamont Hotel. The meeting was called to order by the President, and the minutes of the last literary meeting were read. New members’ names were announced, and others proposed for membership, after which the Schedule of Summer Work was read. Sidney Lanier was the literary subject of the afternoon, and Miss Virginia Cloud [Virginia Woodward Cloud] read his beautiful poem “Sunrise.” Mrs Turnbull [Francese Litchfield Turnbull] gave an original article, “seeking to present his personality to those who had not known him.” He believed in the beauty of holiness and the holiness of beauty, in the importance of the individual; his poetry is full of music and may be called of the neo-Hellenic--Hebraic type. His art life was short. Of him it was rightly said that he was “his own best poem”--“Sure of the father, self, and Love alone.”

By Mrs Turnbull’s request, Miss Cloud read the beautiful love song “In the heart of the Hills of Life,” and she read also the “Ballad of the Trees and the Master." Mrs Theodore Caskin asked for “Corn” which was read in part by Mrs Turnbull, and Mrs Graham [Elizabeth Turner Graham] read “Barnacles."

After the literary exercises a vote of thanks to the President was passed by the Club, and the last literary meeting of the Season closed.

Eliza Ridgely

Secretary

[10]


3rd Salon--June 3rd 1890.

3rd Salon Altamont Hotel; Committees on Art; Committee on Music; Board Meeting, New members voted in; Eminent Women to be first Committee in Autumn; Verses read

The third Salon of the Woman’s Literary Club was held on Tuesday, June 3rd, at four o’clock, in private parlors of the Altamont Hotel. In the absence of the President, the meeting was called to order by the 1st Vice President--Miss Hester Crawford Dorsey [Hester Crawford Dorsey Richardson]. The minutes of the last meeting were read and the “Schedule for Summer Work” was brought forward, when the addition of Committees on “Art” and the “Drama” was suggested, and the Committee on “Music as a Science etc” was formed, with Miss May Evans [May Garrettson Evans], Chairman. Being the last meeting of the Summer, the Board of Management with 7 members present was called together, when new members were voted into the Club, and it was decided that the Committee on “Eminent Women” with Miss Emma Brent [Emma Fenwick Brent], Chairman, shall take charge of the literary entertainment at the next general meeting to be held on the 1st Tuesday of October.

Verses were then read to the Club: by Miss Cloud [Virginia Woodward Cloud] “In a Rose Far”--original, and “Her eyes are like the violet” written by Miss Lizette Woodworth Reese; and by Mrs Dobbin “Foiled Aspirations”--original.

The Salon adjourned having had about 14 members present.

Eliza Ridgely

Secretary

[11]


Board of Management Meeting September 23rd

Board meeting Albion Hotel; Committees; Room for Club; Room Committee, 1st Winter meeting to be reported; Club badge, color, motto, Committee of 1; Reception Committee, Committee of 1; R.S.V.P. on invitations; Invitation to Woman’s Convention; Salon day once a month, tea 

A meeting of the Board of Management of the Woman’s Literary Club was called for Tuesday morning, September 23rd, 1890, at 11.15 o’clock in a private room of the Albion Hotel. Present 8 members--President in the Chair.

By President, subject of Committees taken up and of the selection of a room for the meetings of the Club with suitable platform for officers and member selected to give the reading. Committee of 3--Mrs Lord [Emma Alice Sauerwein Lord], Mrs Tiernan [Mary Spear Tiernan] and Miss Haughton [Louisa Courtland Osburne Haughton] appointed to attend to this matter.

The following decisions made:

That next meeting of Club--first of winter--shall be reported for newspapers;

At suggestion of President that Club badge be adopted, Club color--violet, and Club motto--“Parole femine” (part of Maryland State motto) Miss Haughton was appointed to attend to badges, and to stamping of writing paper for Club invitations;

That Committee of 3 be selected for each meeting to help to receive members;

At Mrs Smith’s [May (?) Smith] suggestion, that list of meeting days for year be printed on cards and distributed for convenience of members; (Mrs Smith was appointed Committee of 1 to attend to printing.) That R.S.V.P. be put on invitations for October 7th;

That we decline because of recent organization, the invitation of Mrs Robinson, President of W.C.T.U.[4] to send a member to read a paper on Club at Women’s Convention in Baltimore October 14th;

That it will be well to hold Salon on last meeting day of each month and only once in the month, and that tea may be provided on that occasion.

Suggestions as follows:

That certain new names be added to Club list, as some

[12]

were given before organization in spring of 1890;

By President, that printed slips containing Sections 1 and 2 of Article 4, and Section 1 on Article 5 be enclosed to new members when invited to join the Club;

That Constitutional clause Article 6 Section 1 on meetings be changed, and election take peace in spring, thus giving new officers summer’s leisure for their arrangements;

By Mrs Smith, that Committee be named to alter Constitution;

That name of Committee on Literary Remains and Curios be altered;

That Dr. Brown furnish list of local artists.

Note also:

The resignation of Miss Haughton from Lake Poets Committee; the partial arrangement of programme for October 7th, and the naming of reception Committee for that day--Mrs Dobbin, Mrs Tutwiler [Julia R. Tutwiler], Miss Cloud [Virginia Woodward Cloud], Mrs Miller. Also: that gentlemen shall not be admitted to Club meetings, except on certain occasions--not usually. Adjourned.

Eliza Ridgely

Secretary             


Board of Management Meeting--October 14th 1890.

Board meeting 861 Garden St.; Honorary member; Names of Committees changed; New Committee.

 

A meeting of the Board of Management of W.L.C. took place at 861 Garden Street on Tuesday, October 14th, at 3.30 o’clock--with 7 present and the President in the chair.

Miss Litchfield [Grace Denio Litchfield] was made an honorary member.

Name of Committee on “Sociology” changed to “Political Economy”, Miss Woods [Katharine Pearson Woods], Chairman. Committee on “Woman’s Work and Wages” to “Woman’s Work and Progress”

New Committee of “Authors and Artists of Maryland” formed, Mrs Alan P. Smith [May (?) Smith], Chairman.

Eliza Ridgely

Secretary

[13]


6th General Meeting--October 7th 1890.

6th Meeting 861 Garden St.; President’s address; Co-education address Mrs Tiernan; Apology--Caskin; Poems--Reese; Paper--Lord; Paper--S.W. Dorsey; Paper--Bent; Poem--Grace; Poems of Empress of Japan

The 6th general meeting of the Woman’s Literary Club, and the 1st business meeting for the autumn of 1890 was held on Tuesday, October 7th, at 861 Garden Street, at 4 o’clock, with the President in the chair and 51 members present. The literary entertainment was as follows:

1. Opening address by the President declaring that the gift of beauty is divine--in writing as elsewhere, and hoping that the Club will be careful always to encourage only that which is truly beautiful, never that which covers evil though it be with the glitter of exquisite words.

2. Address by Mrs Tiernan [Mary Spear Tiernan] on “Co-education”: that it is [why] not harmful to manners, morals, health nor [or] the duties of woman[?]

3. An “Apology” by Mrs Caskin [Mrs. Theodore Caskin] for the non-appearance of her paper on Eminent Women pleading the bewildering fulness of the subject.

4. Five poems from the forth-coming volume of Miss Reese [Lizette Woodworth Reese] recited by Miss Cloud [Virginia Woodward Cloud], namely: “Lord, oft I come”, “Tell me some way”, “April in Town”, “Lydia”, and “An Old Song.”

5. “Women in Literature”, by Mrs Lord [Emma Alice Sauerwein Lord], praising especially--in poetry, Mrs Browning; in fiction, George Eliot--also a greeting to the Club.

6. “A Study in Brilliants” by S.W. Dorsey [Saffie Dorsey]--or an appeal for the undiscovered--in nature, in art, and in the Club-also notice of distinguished writers present and mention of the press.

7. “Eastern Women” by Miss Brent [Emma Fenwick Brent] being uncertain lovely princess--. . . and charming Rebecca--the mother of Israel.

8. Recital by Miss Grace [Mary F. Grace] of a poem on the song of a bird.

9. Poems by Empress of Japan, read by Miss Hester Crawford Dorsey [Hester Crawford Dorsey Richardson], being extracts from the letter of a professor in the university of Tokio. Meeting adjourned. Add proposed members’ names read.[5]

Eliza Ridgely

Secretary

[14]


7th General Meeting October 14th 1890

7th meeting 861 Garden St.; New Committee; Honorary members; Foreign members; Encourage members’ work; New work mentioned; Treasurer’s article; Lecture, Marie Bashkirtseff; Voting on 20 immortelles

The 7th general meeting of the Woman’s Literary Club was held on Tuesday, October 14th, 1890, at 861 Garden Street, at 4 o’clock, with the President in the chair. There were about 25 members present. After the reading of the minutes of the last meeting by the Secretary, the names of the literary Committees were ready by the President and members invited to join them. A new Committee was formed--“The Authors and Artists of Maryland”--Mrs Alan Smith [May (?) Smith], Chairman.

Miss Litchfield [Grace Denio Litchfield] was declared an honorary member of the Club, and Miss Fothergill proposed as such.

It was suggested that certain distinguished women in foreign countries be made honorary members--as Mrs Arthur Caley, Cambridge, England, and Miss Amelia B. Edwards. Also suggested that the literary works of our own members be encouraged and welcomed by the Club. Notice given of a new book of poems by Miss Reese [Lizette Woodworth Reese] and of another story “The Web of Gold” by Miss Woods [Katharine Pearson Woods]. Attention called to the forthcoming article by the Treasurer of the Club in the series of papers on “Woman’s Work in America”[.] Mrs Graham [Elizabeth Turner Graham] through Mrs Lord [Emma Alice Sauerwein Lord] invited the Club to hear Mrs Livermore lecture in the evening at the Woman’s Congress. A paper was read by Mrs Goddard [Li Goddard] on “Marie Bashkirtseff” followed by general conversation on the subject. Also a paper on “Caroline Schlegel” by Mrs Tutwiler [Julia R. Tutwiler], and conversation by the Club.

The members were invited to vote on 20 immortelles in literature, and send answers to “The Critic” through 2nd Vice President. Proposed members’ names read. Meeting adjourned.

Eliza Ridgely

Secretary

[15]


8th General Meeting--October 21st 1890.

8th meeting 861 Garden St.; Alterations in Constitution proposed; Elections day; Salon 1 a month; Club quorum; Moral influence; Papers: Crane on Browning; Lord on Mrs Browning; Mrs Graham’s suggestion; 2 Browning letters; Names proposed read.

The eighth general meeting of the Woman’s Literary Club was held on Tuesday, October 21st, 1890, at 861 Garden Street, at 4 o’clock, with the President in the chair. Members present 32.(?) After reading of minutes of last meeting by Secretary, the President proposed certain alterations in the Constitution that Article 6, Section 1 be changed so that the election of officers shall take place at the last business meeting Tuesday in May instead of the first Tuesday in December. To be considered by the Club and voted upon later; that Section 2 be changed so that a Salon shall be held only the last Tuesday in each month instead of every other week, leaving the other Tuesdays for literary meetings. Also to be voted upon by the Club; that Article 7, Section 1 be added the words “where 20 shall constitute a quorum”, thus more definitely settling the number of votes required to make any change in the Constitution.

The President also called attention to Article 4, Section 2, reminding the Club that moral influence is even more to be desired than literary excellence.

Papers were read by Miss Crane [Lydia Crane] on “Robert Browning”--a poet and a teacher, and by Mrs Lord [Emma Alice Sauerwein Lord] on “Mrs Browning." Mrs Graham [Elizabeth Turner Graham] proposed that the opposite side be taken and a paper given by a non admirer of Browning. Two very interesting unpublished letters of Mr and Mrs Browning were read to the Club by the President.

Names of proposed members read. Meeting adjourned.

Eliza Ridgely

Secretary

[16]


4th Salon--October 28th 1890.

4th Salon 861 Garden St.; Social meeting; Refreshments and tea served; Paper--Graham on John Howard Payne and poem; Poem--President, Mrs Caskin; Committee list and officers circulated

The fourth Salon of the Woman’s Literary Club and the first of autumn of 1890 was held on Tuesday October 28, at 861 Garden Street at 4 o’clock. About 50 members present including the President, Officers and Executive Committee. Meeting in great measure social so that the members might become known to one another. Light refreshments were served and tea tables presided over by Miss H. C. Dorsey [Hester Crawford Dorsey Richardson] and Miss Haughton [Louisa Courtland Osborne Haughton], assisted by Misses Woods [Katharine Pearson Woods], Reese [Lizette Woodworth Reese], Early [Eveline Rieman Early], Dorsey [Saffie Dorsey], Evans [May Garrettson Evans], and Ridgely [Eliza Ridgely]. Later a paper was read by Mrs Graham [Elizabeth Turner Graham] on John Howard Payne ending with a poem. The President also read a poem, and Mrs Caskin {Mrs. Theodore Caskin] on Browning. During the meeting a paper was circulated by Miss Eleanor Turnbull, containing the names of the Officers of the Club, and the list of Committees on literary work with the names of their Chairmen.

Meeting adjourned about 6 o’clock.

Eliza Ridgely

Secretary

[17]


9th General Meeting-- November 4th 1890.

9th meeting 861 Garden St.; “The Brownings” Committee; Poem--Dobbin; Paper--Grace; Poem--President; Voting upon changes in Constitution; Election Day; Salon Day; Club quorum; Members named; Recollections--Adams; Reminiscences--Tait.

The ninth general meeting of the Woman’s Literary Club was held on Tuesday afternoon, November 4th, 1890, at 861 Garden Street, with the President in the chair. Members present 23. The literary work of the meeting was under the auspices of Miss Crane, Chairman of the Committee on “The Brownings”, and its general aim to present the non-admirable side of Robert Browning. After the reading of the minutes of the last general meeting by the Secretary, Mrs Dobbin gave by request “The Poet and the Earth Worm.” Miss Grace [Mary F. Grace] read “The Fall of Ulysses or A Student of Browning,” written by Charles Wright Willard. The President gave by request “A Purée aux Haricots noirs à la Browning” from “Francesca’s Fancies." By desire of the President, the Secretary read to the Club--to be voted upon--certain suggested alterations of the Constitution, as follows: Section 1--To change the annual voting day for Officers from November 1 to the last business meeting day in May. Carried; Section 2. To hold a Salon the last meeting day of each month instead of every other Tuesday. Carried; Section 7. To add to the clause allowing Constitution to be changed by a two thirds vote of the members present at a meeting, the words “where 20 shall constitute a quorum." Carried. After nomination of new members by the Club, Miss Adams gave some personal recollections of Mrs Browning’s funeral--so quiet, so beautiful! Mrs Tait [Anna Dolores Tiernan Tait] read a portion of “The reminiscences of Mrs Tait”, including Browning Criticism of Bleak House. Mrs Caskin [Mrs. Theodore Caskin] suggested that some members of the Club might be able to give personal recollections of some of the Italian refugees. Proposed members’ names read. Adjourned.[6]

Eliza Ridgely

Secretary

[18]


Board Meeting--November 4th 1890.

Board meeting 861 Garden St.; Election of members

Board of Management meeting--Tuesday, November 4th 1890, 861 Garden Street,--after the Club meeting. 5 members present. Honorary members elected:

Mrs Danske Dandridge [Caroline "Danske" Dandridge] nominated by Miss Reese

Miss Fothergill nominated by[7] Miss Haughton [Louisa Courtland Osborne Haughton]

Members elected:

The Misses Middleton. [Maria H. Middleton]

Adjourned.

Eliza Ridgely

Secretary


10th General Meeting--November 11th 1890.

10th meeting 861 Garden St.; Paper--Stockbridge; Poem--Stockbridge; Address--Tiernan; Paper--[?Minor]; Paper--McConkey; John Journal--Grace; Suggestion--Grace

The tenth general meeting of the Woman’s Literary Club was held at 861 Garden Street, on Tuesday afternoon, November 11th, 1890, at 4 o’clock, with the President in the chair. Members present 33. The minutes of the last meeting were read by the Secretary. The first paper was by Mrs Stockbridge [Mrs. Henry Stockbridge] on Mrs Erminia A. Smith of Jersey City, geologist, mineralogist and founder of an aesthetic society. Mrs Stockbridge also read a youthful poem by Mrs WM Crawford, on “a dying shark’s opinion of Mrs Erminia A. Smith." Mrs Tiernan [Mary Spear Tiernan] gave an address on “Expression”--of faces and words, and mentioned the necessity of distinct speaking in our modest America and at the Woman’s Literary Club.

Miss [?Minor] [Fannie Minor?] read a paper on “A Path to Eminence for Women” and the President gave Miss McConkey’s [Miss McCoukey] article entitled “Far above Rubies." Miss Grace [Mary F. Grace] read the account of an interview with mesdames de Recamier and de Stäel, taken from Mrs John Izard Middleton’s Journal written in 1829. The President called attention to the various Committees. Miss Crane [Lydia Crane] suggested that the literary subject for each week be announced at the preceding meeting.[8] Names read.(?) Adjourned.

Eliza Ridgely

Secretary

[19]


Board Meeting November 18th 1890.

Board meeting; Mode of election of new members; Committee proposed

Meeting of the Board of Management was held at 861 Garden Street, Tuesday afternoon, November 18th(?) at 3:30 o’clock, President in chair, all members present. Subject taken up of mode of election of new members, submission of paper (original) by proposed member suggested as test of admission--also suggested that Committee be formed to interview members to be proposed and see if they wish to join the Club. Decision postponed. Mrs Lake [Margaret Lake] elected. Adjourned.

Eliza Ridgely

Secretary


11th General Meeting--November 18th 1890.

11th meeting 861 Garden St.; Names read; Letters of acceptance of honorary members; Paper--Franklin; Discussion; Meeting hour changed; Paper--Dorsey, Paper--Malloy.

The eleventh general meeting of the Woman’s Literary Club was held at 861 Garden Street, on Tuesday afternoon, November 18th at 4 o’clock, with the President in the chair. Members present about 39. The minutes of last meeting were read by Secretary,--also the names of proposed members, and letters of acceptance of honorary membership from Mrs Alice Freeman Palmer and Miss Grace Denio Litchfield. The Treasurer of the Club read an article soon to be published in the 19th Century entitled “Intuition and Reason." Being a reply to Mrs Grant Allen’s paper in the Forum on “Intuition." After general discussion of the subject, the Club, by President’s suggestion, voted to change the hour of meeting, finally adopting 3.30 P.M. Papers were read by Miss M.V. Dorsey [Marian V. Dorsey] on “The Supremacy of the Individual or a Word for the Minority”, and by Miss Malloy [Louise Malloy] on “Women in the Professions”

Meeting adjourned

Eliza Ridgely

Secretary

[20]


5th Salon[9]

[21]


12th General Meeting--December 2nd 1890.

12th meeting 861 Garden St.; Honorary member present; Poems--Cloud; Works presented; Paper--Miller; Poem--Graham; Tale--De Profundis; Poems Dandridge; Letter--Cayley

The twelfth general meeting of the Woman’s Literary Club was held at 861 Garden Street, on Tuesday afternoon, December 2nd, 1890, at 3.30 o’clock, with the President in the chair. About 30 members present, among whom was the honorary member Mrs Dandridge [Caroline "Danske" Dandridge]. The President stated that as nothing has been heard from Mrs Stanley, there would be no Salon on Thursday, December 4th. After reading of minutes of last business meeting by Secretary, Miss Cloud [Virginia Woodward Cloud] read 2 poems. One was “The Garden Way." The President announced that Mrs Dandridge had presented her works to the Club.

A paper was read by Mrs John Miller on Charles Kingsley, poet, clergyman, novelist. After conversation on the topic a poem was read by Mrs Graham [Elizabeth Turner Graham] entitled “The King’s Message,[”] being a selection from her own works which she had presented to the Club.

Miss Haughton [Louisa Courtland Osburne Haughton]--2nd Vice President--read a tale called “De Profundis” written on Sidney Lanier’s poem “Music is Love, in search of a Word." Two poems written by Mrs Dandridge were read by Miss Cloud and Miss Reese [Lizette Woodworth Reese]--”The Dead Moon” and “The Angels’ Song."

After reading by the Secretary of Mrs Cayley’s [Mrs. Arthur Cayley] letter accepting honorary membership, the Club adjourned.

Eliza Ridgely

Secretary

[22]


Board Meeting--December 2nd, 1890

Board meeting 861 Garden St.; Reports to press; 1500 postals; New members; Method of proposal of new members; New members--Miss Toulmin Smith

Meeting of Board of Management held at 861 Garden Street, on Tuesday afternoon, December 2nd after general meeting of Club, President in chair--6 members present. Consultation on subject matter of meeting to be given to newspapers for publication--not definitely settled. Secretary’s request whether 1500 postals should be printed settled affirmatively.

Mrs Wm Yardley [Alice Yardley], new member proposed by Mrs Lord and Mrs Stockbridge. Mrs Stockbridge suggested that Miss Haughton cast vote for Board for new members--carried. Elected: Mrs Dammann [Aileen B. C. Dammann], Mrs Easter [Marguerite E. Easter], Mrs Hurd [Mrs. H. M. Hurd] and Miss Scott.

Suggested that in proposing new members their names and qualifications be given in writing to Committee with names of proposer and seconder. Miss Nicholas proposed by Mrs Tiernan [Mary Spear Tiernan] and Miss Corinne Jackson.

Mrs Colvin [Mary Noyes Colvin] elected--proposed by Mrs Tiernan and others. Miss L. Toulmin Smith to be invited to next general meeting. Adjourned.

Eliza Ridgely

Secretary

[23]


13th General Meeting--December 9th 1890.

13th Meeting 861 Garden St.; Miss Toulmin Smith; Address--Tiernan; Discussion on the religious and the artistic novel; Old M.S.--Smith, 15th Century; Baltimore Tale--Milnor

The thirteenth general meeting of the Woman’s Literary Club was held at 861 Garden Street on Tuesday afternoon, December 9th, at 3.30 o’clock, President in chair--about 45 persons present, among whom Miss L. Toulmin Smith, of Yorkshire, England. Mrs Tiernan [Mary Spear Tiernan] gave an address on “Fiction as an Art” followed by discussion between Mrs Tiernan and Miss K.P. Woods [Katharine Pearson Woods] on the point raised that “the religious novel is not usually the artistic novel”--which was laid aside for fuller discussion on some afternoon. Miss L.T. Smith spoke on “The Story of a 15th Century M.S.”(?) in possession of the Cornwallis family, and described M.S. as containing accounts, poems, and plays indiscriminately written down.

Miss Smith read account of story of dialogue of boy and Roman emperor Hadrian--the boy supposed to be Jesus, and the story to teach of the nine kinds of angels, the three means of attaining life, seven heavens, ways of fasting, etc. Miss Smith also told of old miracle plays--performed in succession, so that by going from one to another, peasants could be instructed in story of Bible, and she read selections from play of “Abraham and Isaac”, of sacrifice on “Mt. Vision”, the boy “so meek” asking for the “quick beast”, of binding of Isaac’s hand, of covering of his face with cloth, of his request that he might at least “not see the sword”, of angel praising Abraham for keeping commandment, and of sacrifice of “gentle sheep." Miss Smith also referred to tale of a purgatory supposed to be in the wilds of Ireland, and designed to teach doctrine of purgatory.

Mrs Tiernan, Chairman of Committee on Fiction then introduced Miss Milnor [Mary Worthington Milnor] and her maiden story “What the Chief Justice said”--a tale of Baltimore and of statue of Chief Justice Taney--read by Miss Milnor. Adjourned.

Eliza Ridgely

Secretary

[24]


Board Meeting--December 12th 1890.

Board meeting 1530 Park Ave; Members’ list; Absent members’ dues; Treasurer’s report; Time of admission of new members; Dues of those who join late; Vote on method of proposing members; Both sides of subject taken

Meeting Board of Management held at President’s residence, 1530 Park Avenue, December 12th at noon, President in chair--all members present. List of uncertain members looked over and settled. Discussion whether members absent from city or detained long at home by illness shall pay full dues--not settled. Treasurer read report.

Questions? Shall members be voted in at any time, or only twice a year? Mrs Franklin [Christine Ladd-Franklin] suggested that we defer this point until next year.

Shall those who join late in year pay full dues? Discussion. Mrs Stockbridge [Mrs. Henry Stockbridge] suggested that dues be paid twice a year and no deduction made just for entrance just before either half yearly payment. Discussion on election of new members. Mrs Smith [May (?) Smith] suggested that proposer must state in writing whether new member is capable and willing to join the Club. Seconded and agreed upon.

Mrs Stockbridge suggested that this motion be read to Club at next meeting, adding that the appreciation must be made to Executive Board, and go into effect after next week.

Mrs Stockbridge suggested to members of Executive Board that in literary subjects both sides be taken up. Considered advisable.

Adjourned.

Eliza Ridgely

Secretary

[25]

 

14th General Meeting--December 16th 1890.

14th meeting 861 Garden St; Portrait given by Mrs Graham; Women as Physicians; Paper--King; Paper--Bullock; Paper--[?Hampton]; Paper--Dr. Hall; Motion--; Magazine and room of our own.

The fourteenth general meeting of the Woman’s Literary Club was held at 861 Garden Street--Tuesday afternoon, December 16th about 3.30 o’clock with the President in chair, and about 45 persons present. After reading of minutes by Secretary, President announced that a portrait of Bayard Taylor had been presented to the Club by Mrs Graham [Elizabeth Turner Graham] to whom warm thanks were tendered, a paper was read by Miss King [Elizabeth T. King] on “The Medical Education of Women”, treating of the more recent development of the subject, of the advantage for study now given to women in many cities of the U.S., in many parts of Europe and in Canada and India, and of the necessity of co-education in many respects, for the sake of gaining needed self reliance.

Mrs Bullock’s [Caroline Canfield Bullock] paper was upon “The Attitude of the Medical Profession towards Women Physicians” saying that in story and history, women in ancient times were taught medicine in individual cases, and in the college of physicians in Egypt, and--after a shuffle--in Athens; that, in Italy, between 1300 and 1800 many women were noted in medicine; that they were absolutely discountenanced by Philadelphia Medical Society in 1858; only half taught and received in the amphitheatre with shouts and hisses in Chicago; but finally overcoming all difficulties until one eighth of Boston physicians are women, and there are two or more women doctors in nearly every Southern state, and many women assistants in charge of females in insane asylums, while Dr Alice Bennett in Norristown is the successful chief in command of the female wards.

A paper was read by Miss [?Hampton] on “How Women Physicians are regarded by the [?Laity]”, stating that,

[26]

although women are allowed to become doctors, neither men nor women like the profession to be adopted by members of their own families, that truly women in the past have not been fully qualified and must set up a higher standard--higher than men have set--that women have worked against women even more than men have done; and suggesting that women physicians are very much needed in the country, and that it would be better to close smaller schools and often large well fitted colleges.

The next paper was by Dr Alice Hall [Alice T. Hall Chapman], Chairman of Committee on “Women as Physicians” on “The Success of Women as Physicians." Dr Hall said that their financial success is good, average income being $2907.30 against $1500 for the average man physician, their ability may not yet be fully proved as women have not written much nor sought causes of disease, although they have invented some instruments, their authority and influence may be proved by power at least in the insane asylums, but whether her physical strength is sufficient has not yet been worked out. Women should be made supervisors of health.

Miss Brent [Emma Fenwick Brent] made a motion that these papers be given to the public, seconded by Mrs Graham--who moved also that another paper be prepared on “What Women do in Medicine." 1st motion amended for reasons of economy by Mrs Franklin [Christine Ladd-Franklin] who proposed to give papers to an existing magazine. Carried. Dr Hall seconded by Miss Haughton [Louisa Courtland Osburne Haughton] suggested that Dr Hurd [Kali Campbell Hurd] prepare the paper asked for by Mrs Graham. Carried. Both matters entrusted to Dr Hall’s care. Mrs Graham suggested that one day we may have a magazine and a room of our own, and stated that Mrs Rosalie Baker had promised personal reminiscences of Howard Payne.

Adjourned.

Eliza Ridgely

Secretary

[27]


Board Meeting--December 23rd 1890.

Board meeting 861 Garden St.; members (new)

Meeting of Board of Management of Woman’s Literary Club held on Tuesday, December 23rd, 1890, after 3 o’clock, with President in chair and 6 (?) members present. Declared members: Dr Nellie V. Mark, Dr. Sherwood [Mary Sherwood], Miss [Latimer][Elizabeth Wormeley Latimer] and Miss Finley [Isabel B. Finley].

Eliza Ridgely

Secretary


15th General Meeting--December 23rd 1890.

15th meeting 861 Garden St; Song--Yardley “Home, Sweet Home”; Paper--Graham; Attention called to Prof. Crouch; Poems--Easter; Lanier Criticism (President) by Mr Hutton; Letter--Martineau

The fifteenth general meeting of the Woman’s Literary Club was held at 861 Garden Street, on Tuesday afternoon, December 23rd at 3.30 o’clock, with the President in the chair--about 27 persons present. After minutes of last meeting had been read by Secretary, Mrs Yardley [Alice Yardley] sang Payne’s “Home, Sweet Home”, assisted by Mrs Miller and the Club. Mrs Graham [Elizabeth Turner Graham] read a paper on John Howard Payne whom she would have preferred to treat as a dramatist, had this not been “an afternoon with the poets." Mrs Graham recommended Payne’s Life by Gabriel Harrison and stated that the musical outline of “Home, Sweet Home” had been taken by Payne from a Sicilian air, arranged by Bishop, and with the words, first brought out publicly, in the opera of “Clara”, at Covent Garden Theatre, London, May 8--1823. A painting of a fireplace in John Howard Payne’s home in East Hampton was shown by Mrs Graham to the Club. Mrs Lord [Alice Emma Sauerwein Lord] called attention to Professor F. Nicholls Crouch who resides in Baltimore, the composer of the music of Kathleen Mavourneen, and the writer of many poems. Mrs Easter [Marguerite E. Easter] read these original poems: “The Blessed Bambino”, “Summer’s Farewell” and “At Moon’s Meridian." The President read a complimentary criticism on Sidney Lanier by Mr Hutton editor of “The Spectator” an English magazine. Miss Haughton [Louisa Courtland Osburne Haughton] announced that an

[28]

English clergyman had spoken of “Sun Springs” as the most exquisite poem he had ever read. The President read a letter from James Martineau, saying that Sidney Lanier should have been rather a musical composer than a poet as his depth of feeling was greater than his imagination or poetic skill. President announced that at Salon on following week Mrs Latimer [Elizabeth Wormeley Latimer] would read “The Vision of St Anthony” to which was added a poem by Miss Reese [Lizette Woodworth Reese]. Adjourned.

Eliza Ridgely

Secretary


6th Salon--December 30th 1890

6th Salon 861 Garden St.; Poem--Latimer; Poem--Reese; Social meeting

The sixth Salon of the W.L.C. was held at 861 Garden Street Tuesday afternoon, December 30th 1890 at 3.30 o’clock, with President in chair. About 34 persons present

Mrs Latimer [Elizabeth Wormeley Latimer] read “The Vision of St Anthony”--published in the January ‘91 number of Hopkin’s monthly magazine. Miss Reese [Lizette Woodowrth Reese] read a poem--”A Lover’s Soul." Tea, coffee and cake were handed, and the rest of the afternoon was given to general conversation. Adjourned.

Eliza Ridgely

Secretary

[29]


16th General Meeting, January 6th 1891

16th meeting 861 Garden St.; Letter--Dandridge; “The Lake Poets” Paper--Lord; Paper--Griffin; Paper--Tutwiler; Paper--Easter.

The sixteenth general meeting of W.L.C. held at 861 Garden Street, Tuesday afternoon, January 6th 1891, at 3.30 o’clock--President in chair. Members present about 34. Letter was read by Secretary from Mrs Danske Dandridge [Caroline "Danske" Dandridge] presenting her book of poems “Rose Brake” to the Club.

Mrs Lord [Emma Alice Sauerwein Lord], Chairman of Committee on “The Lake Poets” gave a paper introducing them--Wordsworth, Coleridge, Southey. Mrs Griffin [Rebecca Griffin] gave a paper on Wordsworth--speaking of triads necessary to--poetry--1. endowment of genius; 2nd training of experience; 3rd happiness of expression;--again--heart and eye for nature, and boldness to expound her;--that Wordsworth writes according to Coleridge’s testimony with “austere purity of style”--also a poet of nature although as has been said man is often “kept waiting while the poet muses." Mrs Tutwiler [Julia R. Tutwiler] read a paper on Southey--describing him as having literary faculty--no genius; as being industrious--not inspired with the faculty of construction abnormal. The next paper was on Coleridge by Mrs Easter [Marguerite E. Easter] read by Mrs Miller--Coleridge a fine thinker but an intellectual criminal, having defrauded mankind by work only partly completed--the “Ancient Mariner” being the only finished work in a “life of beginnings.”

Adjourned.

Eliza Ridgely

Secretary

[30]


Board Meeting--January 6th 1891.

Board meeting 861 Garden St.; New member; Constitution given in charge

Meeting of Board of Management January 6th 1891--861 Garden Street. President in chair--6 members present.

Miss Bessy L. Clark 835 Hamilton Terrace, proposed by Mrs Franklin [Christine Ladd-Franklin], seconded by Miss Ridgely [Eliza Ridgely] was voted in, and on Mrs Franklin’s suggestion, voted in <em>at once</em>[10] as laws of election were not as clearly defined as might be.

Change of printing of Constitution committed to Secretary--Treasurer consenting to correct the proofs.

Adjourned.

Eliza Ridgely

Secretary

Board Meeting--January 13th 1891.

Board meeting 861 Garden St.; Resolutions of regret on death of Mrs Tiernan

A meeting of Board of Management W.L.C. was called for Tuesday afternoon, January 13th at 2.30 o’clock--861 Garden Street.

The business meeting was postponed, and Miss Brent [Emma Fenwick Brent] was appointed to draw up at once resolutions of regret on the death of Mrs Mary Spear Tiernan to be passed by the Club at the meeting.

The Board decided also to send flowers, and to attend Mrs Tiernan’s funeral as a Club.

Eliza Ridgely

Secretary

[31]

17th General Meeting--January 13th 1891

17th meeting 861 Garden St.; Death of Mrs Tiernan announced; Resolutions passed.

The seventeenth general meeting of the Woman’s Literary Club was called for Tuesday, January 13th at 3.30 o’clock--861 Garden Street

On learning the great loss that had come to the Club in the death of Mrs Mary Spear Tiernan, the meeting adjourned after passing resolutions of regret.

Eliza Ridgely

Secretary

18th General Meeting--January 20th 1891.

18th meeting 861 Garden St.; President’s New Year’s address; President’s tribute to Mrs Tiernan; Tiernan memorial day.; Zacharias’ poem.; Miss Cloud read Mrs Lord’s poem; Secretary read resolutions; Mrs Graham on Woman’s Work and Progress; Miss C. P. Woods’ [Katharine Pearson Woods] papers on “Woman in Church and State”; Dr Mark spoke on women.; Class in Political Economy; Reception to Miss Dorsey proposed.; Motion on wedding gift.

The eighteenth meeting of W.L.C. was held on Tuesday, January 20th 1891, at 861 Garden Street, at 3.30 o’clock--President in chair--about 28 persons present. The President gave a New Year’s address to the Club stating that true talent is born of reverence and included true desire for truth and progress, and expressing the wish that the best talent of the Club may be brought out, and suggesting association in Committees as one means to this end. The President also spoke of the great power for good Mrs Tiernan [Mary Spear Tiernan] might have had in the Club, had she lived, of the gifts of voice and speech, of her vivacity, enthusiasm, courtesy and keen interest in literature. The Club noted by motion of President that a memorial day be appointed for Mrs Tiernan. The President read a note from Miss Zacharias [Jane Zacharias] accompanying an original poem on the death of Mrs Tiernan. Miss Cloud [Virginia Woodward Cloud] then read Mrs Lord’s [Alice Emma Sauerwein Lord] poem on Mrs Tiernan, and the Secretary read the resolutions of regret adopted by the Club.

Mrs Graham [Elizabeth Turner Graham] spoke on “Woman’s Work and Progress”, suggesting that the surest advance is always through the conquest of self.

[32]

Miss Woods [blank space] Pearson Woods[11] read a paper on “Woman in Church and State” -- we speak of Mother Church, Mother Country, yet men are the sole rulers, and women have no voice in the affairs of either. Some say that woman’s sphere is the four walls of home--unscientific conclusion woman’s orbit must be regulated by balance of powers within and without. The sexes agree that in Church and State men shall rule--women be ruled, yet both were created in the image of God. The dual principle ignored exerts itself in disease and divorce. Woman, as the uncompromising holder of ideas, the world misses in leaving out woman. Man will not be the heaven-father to his household, the woman must become so. We see the dual nature in her: the heaven-father to her children, for then she must go out into the world and protect them at the polls from disease and death. Woman’s presence must purify commerce and make the state religious, that the dual nature may also come into Church and State. She should not be parish priest; for man is the priest--woman the prophet--and both should lead onto victory.

Dr Mark [Nellie V. Mark] spoke next. She approved of women as ministers and at the polls, though they cannot be injured by voting, and need not fear disrespect at the polls, as was proved in Boston when they voted on the school question.

The President announced the subject of the next meeting, and stated that a class in Political Economy would be formed and would be open to all.

The proposition that the Club give a reception to Miss H.C. Dorsey [Hester Crawford Dorsey Richardson] after her wedding was made by Mrs Franklin [Christine Ladd-Franklin], seconded by Mrs Easter [Marguerite E. Easter] and passed.

Also the mention that the Club give some little remembrance to

[33]

Miss Dorsey was passed.

Adjourned.

Eliza Ridgely

Secretary

 

Board Meeting--January 20th 1891

Board of Management 861 Garden St.; Reception to Miss Dorsey; decoration committee; Constitution: Article on Literary Committee; On residents of Baltimore; Non-resident guests.

A meeting of the Board of Management of W.L.C. was held at 861 Garden Street, on Tuesday, January 20th. Reception to be offered to Miss H.C. Dorsey (Mrs Albert L. Richardson) [Hester Crawford Dorsey Richardson] was agreed upon, and a decoration committee suggested.

Subject of the Constitution brought forward and the article on Literary Committee (Section I of Article 3.) was discussed. It was suggested that it may be used at least as a standing committee to decide literary points. It was decided for the present to leave it in the body of the Constitution, and if necessary, to add a defining clause as a By-Law.

Decided that residents of Baltimore may only be brought to the Club as visitors very occasionally. Any member may bring a non-resident guest.

Eliza Ridgely

Secretary

[34]

 

19th General Meeting--January 28th 1891

19th meeting 861 Garden St.; Letter from 1st Vice President; Franklin--paper on Co-education; Next meeting.; Lanier memorial; Reception February 6; President’s address on one of papers on Medical Education of Women”; Conversation on medical education for women, co-education

The nineteenth general meeting of the W.L.C. was called for Tuesday afternoon, January 28th 1891, at 3.00 o’clock, at 861 Garden Street.

The President was in the chair, and there were about 36 persons present.

A letter was read from Miss Hester Crawford Dorsey [Hester Cawford Dorsey Richardson], first Vice President of the Club.

Mrs Franklin [Christine Ladd-Franklin] read a paper on the “Education of Women in the South” which is soon to be published with other articles in the shape of a book called “Women in America." Mrs Franklin said that in the Southern states the lighter graces--as music--are more cultivated, and it is not easy to raise the desire for lighter studies. In 1840 there was a general awakening, and now there are 150 institutions capable to confer college degrees: of these 40 are co-educational, 21 for the colored of both sexes, 88 for women only. If only the University of Virginia would open its doors to women, modern education would close in on the whole South. In the Woman’s College of Baltimore the grade is the same as in men’s colleges, and there are laboratories and professors, a gymnasium, etc. The Southern wealth is getting so great that the standard of women’s colleges should rise. It is not necessary that all colleges should be open to women--they only ask admission to the best colleges. Bishop Hurst says the new University in Washington will be open to women. The Peabody fund established 114 free scholarships in 10 states, and industrial training was established in 1852. The Mississippi industrial school is excellent, and worthy of invitation.

The President announced that the next meeting would be held in her house, and would be kept as a memorial of Sidney Lanier,

[35]

being the anniversary of his birth. The President also stated that a reception would be given at “The Lyceum” in February 6th, in honor of Miss Dorsey, one of the founders of the Club who was to be married. All Club members would have an invitation for an escort, and full dress would be worn if possible. Any flowers or art works sent for the reception should be to the care of Miss Adams. An address was then read by the President in reference to one of the papers read on the “Medical Education of Women”, in which she stated that the papers are full of concentrated thought and research, but there had been one point not sufficiently discussed. We must be careful in seeking the lighter education of women--in co-education, in climbing we must be careful not to inspire the delicate heart of refinement which gives women a certain advantage. Of course the proper aim of medicine is to eliminate itself, and necessity may at first require training that may later be set aside; for at first we consider </em ideas /em>, then methods. Now that women are honest and earnest, let us protect the methods of learning medicine for the sake of future students.

Mrs Smith [May (?) Smith] announced that Miss Evarts holds a chair of medicine in Brussels.

Dr Hall [Alice T. Hall Chapman] said that in Stockholm there are women professors of mathematics, and in Italy, woman are associate professors of pathology and lecture to both men and women. Dr Hurd [Kali Campbell Hurd] said she had been always treated very well by men; she thought that women should be able to take a graduate-student course.

Mrs Franklin thought co-education would make the after-practice--as in consultation--less embarrassing.

[36]

Dr Hall thought the influence of co-education on the refinement of women would be decided only by time. Miss Haughton [Louisa Courtland Osburne Haughton] suggested that women’s colleges should set a standard so high that only good, earnest women could enter.

Dr Hall also thought the better women seek higher culture, the inferior wish easy work.

The President thought when married women could write treatises.

Adjourned.

Eliza Ridgely

Secretary

 

20th General Meeting--February 3rd 1891

20th meeting 1530 Park Avenue; Lanier memorial; Nevins’ musical tribute; President’s address; Lanier’s unpublished letters; Haman read “Sunrise”; Easter--original lines; Cloud read selections; Reese original verses; President gave “Sketch”; Lanier read “Dewdrop”, and Burton’s letter and sonnet; Graham original verses; Whitelock original verses; Dandridge’s verses; President lines; Music by Beethoven Terrace Amateur Orchestra

The twentieth general meeting of the Woman’s Literary Club was held on Tuesday afternoon, February 3rd, after 3.30 o’clock, at the residence of the President, and was kept as a memorial day to Sidney Lanier being the anniversary of the poet’s birth. There were about 37 members present. Various memorials to the poet were shown--among others a musical tribute by Miss Nevins on “The Trees and the Master." The President addressed the Club on the birthday of the poet, and, suggesting that his own words are his best description, read some of his spontaneous utterances in unpublished letters--on Chopin, on Wagner “whose music is a gospel”, of the “bud notes” of Neilsson, of Schumann who has the fault of Germans their thought and genius showing want of fulness. Mrs Haman [Louise C. Haman] read Lanier’s poem “Sunrise”

[37]

to the Club.

Mrs Easter [Marguerite E. Easter] gave original lines on the poet’s words, “I am lit with the sun."

Miss Cloud [Virginia Woodward Cloud] read selections from “The Marshes of Glynn”, and Miss Reese [Lizette Woodworth Reese] original verses entitled “The Lost Shepherd." The President gave Lanier’s “Sketch for a Marsh Hymn No. 4--Between Dawn and Sunrise."

Mrs Lanier [Mary Day Lanier] read “The Dewdrop” by a Southern friend, and Richard Burton’s letter and sonnet “In Memoriam”

Original verses were given by Mrs Graham [Elizabeth Turner Graham]--”A Tribute”, and by Mrs Whitelock [Louise Clarkson Whitelock] “To Sidney Lanier."

The President read Mrs Dandridge’s [Caroline "Danske" Dandridge] verses “To Sidney Lanier”, and Miss Grace [Mary F. Grace] read selections from the poet’s prose astride “From Bacon to Beethoven”, printed in the “No name” number of Lippincott’s magazine for 1888. He said in effect, that music is not language, but language is a kind of music. Drawing must be assisted by reason as it possesses neither distance nor magnitude. True music and true morality will increase together. The piano is an imperfect instrument, having <em fixed /em>[12] tones, Shakespeare is master of conventional--Beethoven of unconventional tones; where Shakespeare ends, Beethoven begins.

The President then added a few words from herself, and lines written by her on Lanier’s visit to the woods with his family.

The Club was invited to the music room where selections were given by the Beethoven Terrace Amateur Orchestra, and the poet’s flute was used.

[38]

The selections were “Flower Song” from Lange, “Evening Star” (from Tannhäuser) by Wagner, and “The Palms” by Faure, after which refreshments were served, and the Club adjourned.

Eliza Ridgely

Secretary

 

1st Reception--February 6th 1891

1st reception; The Lyceum; Conversation; Refreshments--Given to Mr and Mrs Richardson; Badge presented

The first public reception of the Woman’s Literary Club of Baltimore was given in the Lyceum Parlors on Friday evening, February 6th 1891, at 7 o’clock.

The President and some of the members of the Executive Committee (or Board) received the guests, and the evening was spent in general conversation.

There were about 115 persons present.

Refreshments were served about 9 o’clock. The reception was given to Mr and Mrs Albert Levin Richardson.

Mrs Richardson [Hester Crawford Dorsey Richardson] is the 1st Vice President, and was one of the chief organizers of the Club. A badge in gold and amethysts bearing the Club monogram was presented to Mrs Richardson as a souvenir by the Club.

Eliza Ridgely Secretary

 

Board Meeting--February 17th 1891

A meeting of the Board of Management of W.L.C. was called for 2.30 o’clock P.M., Tuesday afternoon, February 17th at 861 Garden Street.

The President in the chair. Members of the Executive Board present 7.

Names of new members were proposed and voted upon. Mrs Franklin [Christine Ladd-Franklin], Treasurer, moved that the names of proposer and seconder of names of new members be preserved by the Secretary. Passed.

The Secretary announced that Mrs Tutwiler [Julia R. Tutwiler] had offered her rooms free to the Club for the remainder of the season. Answer postponed until the next meeting of the Committee.

Vote taken as to the name of the Club--whether it should be changed from Woman’s Literary Club to Women’s Literary Club. Majority voted for no change. Mrs Franklin moved that the vacancies in the Board of Management be filled at once. Majority voted otherwise for the present, as there is danger of another vacancy.

Action on the election of Chairman for certain vacancies deferred.

Printing of the Constitution also deferred.

Adjourned.

Eliza Ridgely Secretary

 

21st General Meeting--February 17th 1891

The twenty-first general meeting of the Woman’s Literary Club was held at 861 Garden Street, on Tuesday afternoon, February 17th, at 3.30 o’clock, with the President in the chair. There were about 33 persons present.

A note was read to the Club by the President from Mrs [?Brune]- sister to Mrs Tiernan [Mary Spear Tiernan].

By Mrs Graham’s [Elizabeth Turner Graham] suggestion, it was decided that the following Tuesday should be kept as a Longfellow Memorial Day.

The announcement of the Reading by Mrs Cowell [?Lemoyne] for the benefit of the “Home for Mothers and Infants” was made as a special notice by the President. Two poems “Sunlight” and “Pain”, written by one of our Honorary members-Miss Grace Denio Litchfield- were read by Miss Cloud [Virginia Woodward Cloud] and Mrs Turnbull [Francese Litchfield Turnbull].

Mrs Easter’s [Marguerite E. Easter] poem “Antigone” was read by Mrs Haman [Louise C. Haman]. Miss Lizette Woodworth Reese gave a paper on “A little-known Poet”- Henry Timrod, born in Charleston S.C. 1829, died 1867.

Miss Cloud [Virginia Woodward Cloud] gave a paper on “Nursery Rhymes” referring-also-to ten lullabies of nations.

The President read two original poems- “A Hymn to Old Age” written to her own grandmother, and “A Lyric of Love and Life."

Mrs Whitelock [Louise Clarkson Whitelock] read original verses: “A Honeymoon in the [?Farnese] Gardens."

Mrs Graham [Elizabeth Turner Graham] moved that each member be allowed on Tuesday to invite a friend interested in Longfellow. Motion not carried, as President stated such was not the habit of the Club.

Mrs Graham presented to Miss Reese, Chairman of the Poetry Committee, for the “Poet’s Corner”, “A Valentine Greeting” from Mrs Graham and Mrs Yardley [Alice Yardley]--being a booklet entitled “A Captive Rose”--words by Mrs Graham--illustrations by Mrs Yardley.

Adjourned.

Eliza Ridgely Secretary

 

22nd General Meeting--February 24th 1891

The twenty second general meeting of the Woman’s Literary Club was held at 861 Garden Street, on Tuesday afternoon, February 24th, at 3.30 o’clock, with the President in the chair. There were about 37 persons present.

The day was kept as a memorial of the poet Longfellow, and Mrs Graham [Elizabeth Turner Graham] lent of the occasion the copy of Turner’s picture “The Courtship of Miles Standish”, and the etching by the artist himself of his picture “The Wedding Procession of Miles Standish.”

The President read a short address reminding the Club that Memorial day should not be a sad but a glad occasion.

Mrs Latimer gave some personal reminiscences of Longfellow. She knew him when he was a young man, and took much interest in his love affairs, know of is unsuccessful courtship of Miss [?Fannie] Appleton of which “Hyperion” is the story, told of his visit abroad to the waters, how he came home to Boston quite whole-hearted, went to a Germania concert where the only vacant seat was by Miss Appleton, but, being [?cared], he resolved to take that one, had a pleasant evening, and feeling quite safe, resolved to call upon Miss Appleton--which resulted in an engagement in three weeks.

Mrs Latimer [Elizabeth Wormeley Latimer] also told that in a discussion at a dinner of the relative beauty of Mrs [?Norton] the Duchess of Sutherland, Dickens had pronounced the latter “The most Kissable”, and that when Mrs [?Agassiz] had found a snake in her [?shippers]. Agassiz hastened to enquire for “the other nine."

Mrs Latimer also spoke of Longfellow’s kindness to other authors, of his letters to herself--one dated Cambridge 1853, thanking her for her novel “Amabel."

Longfellow’s poem “Footsteps of Angels” was read by Mrs Atkinson [Mrs. Robert Atkinson], and the President read a note from Mrs Easter [Marguerite E. Easter] saying that Evangeline was the first verse that appealed to her heart, and enclosing a “Sonnet to Evangeline”--also read by the President.

Miss Adams presented one of Longfellow’s autographs to the Club, sent by her sister Mrs Fields.

Miss Adams said that her knowledge of the poet was through his publisher--Mr Fields. Longfellow had a great aptitude for acquiring foreign languages, but was not much of a talker. Miss Adams had by Longfellow’s request, made a sketch of the rock of [?Norman’s] Woe, for which she had received a letter of thanks.

Miss Adams also read extracts from the poet’s letters to Mr and Mrs Fields.

Moved and adopted by the Club that Mrs Lord’s [Alice Emma Sauerwein] paper be read at the next meeting, and further selections from Longfellow’s works.

Adjourned.

Eliza Ridgely Secretary

 

Board Meeting--March 3rd 1891

A meeting of the Board of Management of the W.L.C. was held on Tuesday afternoon, March 3rd, shortly before 3.30 o’clock, with the President in the chair, and 6 members present.

New members were proposed and elected: [Mrs] Hurd [H. M. Hurd], Miss Mary Willcox-Brown [Mary Wilcox Brown], Miss Annie C. Volck.

The President informed the Board of the death of a non-resident member-Mrs Chapman Coleman.

The Secretary was requested to decline Mrs Tutwiler’s [Julia R. Tutwiler] kind offer to the Club of the use of her rooms for the remainder of the season. The habit of the Club has been to meet in a hired hall; and a similar offer had ahead, been declined.

Eliza Ridgely Secretary

 

23rd General Meeting--March 3rd 1891

The twenty third general meeting of the Woman’s Literary Club was held at 861 Garden Street, on Tuesday afternoon, March 3rd, at 3.30 o’clock. The President was in the chair.

There were about 18 members present, and Miss Grace Denio Litchfield, honorary member.

After the minutes of the last meeting has been read by the Secretary, Mrs Lord [Alice Emma Sauerwein Lord] gave “A Longfellow Critique” describing the poet’s shorter productions as elevating in sentiment--illustration, “Learn how sublime a thing it is to suffer and be strong”; referring to his longer poems to Hiawatha as an epic, to Miles Standish and Evangeline as idylls; and remarking on the strong color given to Longfellow’s style by his familiarity with the literature of other nations.

Miss Cloud [Virginia Woodward Cloud] read the description of a scene in “Evangeline” and by request an original poem “The Rose Far”, soon to be published.

The President read Longfellow’s poem on “Flowers”, and Mrs Stockbridge [Mrs. Henry Stockbridge] gave a paper on “Japanese Flowers”, first suggesting that the profession of landscape gardening is open to woman, and that we should study the plants of our own country. Japanese landscape gardening balances carefully between deciduous and evergreen trees, and the gardens harmonise in sentiment with the rank of the owners. Often they are used as chapels--they have been defined as “a place to retire after sleep”--they embody ideas, as “Domestic bliss in old age”, and are often retreats from the world. If aught in nature is wanted, something artificial is substituted: thus--a path of pebbles fringed with plants stands for a stream of water, and in an imitation of “The Pass of [?Hikone]”, camellia trees evenly trimmed represented a plateau. Mrs Stockbridge had also seen a bridge literally made of growing wisteria.

A magnificent Japanese tree is the exogenous umbrella pine with its cinnamon colored bark--its branches being sometimes 18 inches in diameter 50 feet from the stem. A row of these trees is growing well at the Agricultural College, Amherst, Mass. The bamboo of which there are impenetrable forests, is a most useful tree of pliant nature; and at a certain season the wealth of cherry blossoms is very attractive. The wood of the camellia is burnt for black lacquer; but the chief flower of Japan is the chrysanthemum. At the famous shows in the season, the flowers and plants are grown in panoramic tableaux--some even representing scenes from plays. In one much advised garden, the plants had all been artificially [?killed], making a most pleasing variety of shades, while in another a large which elephant was presented in growing flowers. At the university of Tokio, there is a three years’ course of study in making bouquets.

Before the adjournment of the Club, the President announced the death of a non-resident member--Mrs Chapman Coleman.

Adjourned.

Eliza Ridgely Secretary

 

24th General Meeting--March 10th 1891

The twenty fourth general meeting of the Woman’s Literary Club was held at 861 Garden Street, on Tuesday afternoon, March 10th at 3.30 o’clock.

In the absence of the President, the 2nd Vice-President was in the chair, and later, when obliged to leave, the meeting was presided over by the Treasurer.

After the minutes of the last meeting had been read by the Secretary Miss Szold [Henrietta Szold] gave a paper on “Emma Lazarus." ‘Although woman’s nature is full of art, poetry, and high endurance, still she is very practical. The same strong ideality yet extreme reality and practical energy are expecially noticeable in Jewish character. Emma Lazarus is less great in her earlier writings, and her article on “Disraeli” is untrue to her nation. After the Russian edict of 1882 was passed, she changed entirely--her poetry became sweeter and more earnest, her works full of practical suggestions and passionate feeling. Her aim was to find what to do with the persecuted Jews: if colonised, the new comers should be taught trades. To her surprise, she now found the Jewish heart true, warm and even pure; Daniel was the Jew os the future, and Mordecai’s ideas were hers. Miss Szold said that repatriation is not favorable, regarded in this country, and in Russie [Russia] the political barriers seem too great--the Russian [?bear] so close to Palestine and the sick man of Turkey so weak. However, Hebrew is being studied in Russia and taught and spoken in Palestine to avoid the mixture of many tongues.”

After conversation by the Club, Mrs Griffin [Rebecca Griffin] read a paper on “Early Mosaics”--that their recommendation is indestructibility they build for eternity. There are three kinds--those made from cubes of marble, from slices of marble, and from slaves. During the reading of this paper, photographs of various mosaics were shown to the Club.

A paper on “Occult Boston” was then given by Miss Frances Alvert Dought, of Washington, D.C., speaking of that part of Boston where live one or more theosophists; Dr Mayne--the mind-reader; and Dr [?Ahrens] of the mind cure, to whom disease is a cancer-crab shaped image clutching the mind with its claws. Miss Dought also gave “A Frenchman’s Account of the Garden of Eden."

The acting President announced the subject of the next meeting “A Moral Purpose in Fiction”, and the Club adjourned.

Eliza Ridgely Secretary

 

Board Meeting--March 10th 1891

An informal meeting of the Board of Management W.L.C. was held at 861 Garden Street, on Tuesday afternoon, March 10th, after the general meeting of the Club.

The name of Mrs Atkinson was added to the Committee of resolutions on the death of Mrs [Chapman?] Coleman, non-resident member. The other members of the Committee are Mrs Franklin [Christine Ladd-Franklin], Mrs Bullock [Caroline Canfield Bullock] and Miss Zacharias [Jane Zacharias]. Might be mentioned [?] is the friend of the deceased, and Mrs Smith [May (?) Smith] thought the resolutions themselves should be signed by the President and Secretary.

Adjourned.

Eliza Ridgely Secretary

 

Board Meeting--March 17th 1891

A meeting of the Board of Management of W.L.C. was held at 861 Garden Street, on Tuesday afternoon, March 17th, about 2.30 o’clock, with the President in the chair. There were 7 members present.

Committee rejected proposal to give a reception to Mr Stedman, as the President stated that Mr Stedman had so many engagements.

The name of the Club was declared as “The Woman’s (not Women’s) Literary Club, as President thought the decision accorded with the opinion of the majority of the Committee. Mrs Miller was made Chairman of the Committee on “Fiction” in place of Mrs Tiernan [Mary Spear Tiernan], deceased.

The Secretary proposed as a By-Law the motion taken [?by] association that “Any vacancy in office except that of President shall be filled by the Board for the unexpired term." Postponed by Treasurer who thought the Club in general was not pleased with the amount of power already in the hands of the Board. Mrs Griffin [Rebecca Griffin] and Mrs Miller were nominated to fill the vacancies in the Board of Management caused by the death of Mrs Tiernan and the resignation of Miss Emma Brent [Emma Fenwick Brent]. The By-Law made at the Board meeting May 23rd 1890, and which reads ”Honorary members shall be made only by invitation of the Executive Committee”, was placed in the body of the Constitution and was changed to “Honorary membership shall be extended only to those who will confer distinction upon the Club by their attainments in literature and science and only by invitation of the Board of Management.”

By request of the Treasurer, the Secretary read Article 2, Section 6, and to it were added the words, “and shall read a report to the Club at least twice a year.” Section 1 of Article 3 was retained in the body of the Constitution, and Mrs Franklin [Christine Ladd-Franklin] suggested that one of the the duties of the Literary Committees where they would prefer to serve. It was suggested to withdraw Section 5 of Article 4 of election with the additions which the Secretary was requested to put in form for consideration at the next meeting.

Eliza Ridgely Secretary

 

25th General Meeting--March 17th 1891

The twenty fifth general meeting of the Woman’s Literary Club was held at 861 Garden Street on Tuesday afternoon, March 17th at 3.30 o’clock, with the President in the chair. There were about 30 persons present. The minutes of the last meeting were read by the Secretary, and a short greeting to the Club was given by the President who announced the publication of “Woman’s Work in America” edited by Mrs Anna Nathan Meyer, and containing the paper on “Education in the South” by Mrs Franklin [Christine Ladd-Franklin]. Mrs Miller read a paper on “Novels”, tracing their growth through the legend, ballad, epic, take [tale], and romance to their present form. Good novels may teach experience, break down narrowness, and inculcate great truths--from them one may learn heroism, self-sacrifice, charity. Novelists have a noble mission to perform in the training of the young.

A note from Mrs Tiernan [Mary Spear Tiernan] on her last novel “Jack Horner” was read by the President.

Miss Mason gave a paper on “The Moral Element in Fiction”, stating that books of fictitious values beautify evil which alone is so unattractive, and that from weighing the moral element in fiction, we turn to see fiction as a moral element. Miss Mason [M. P. Mason] doubted if there is any book that does not produce some moral effect--noteworthy practical example: the People’s Palace of London.

Miss Hoffman [Fanny Hoffman] read a paper on “Moral Purpose in Fiction” --A novel should be a work of art passing from the actual to the ideal world, tracing out the results of sin and rewards of virtue. A moral purpose should run through all novels, as they educate for good and evil.

The President announced that at the next meeting certain constitutional clauses should be taken up by the Club, and two members elected to the Board of Management in place of Mrs Tiernan and Miss Brent [Emma Fenwick Brent].

The President also read selections from Lanier and Stedman on works of art, and announced the subject “A Moral Purpose in Fiction” for present discussion. Mrs Latimer [Elizabeth Wormeley Latimer] thought the object of the novel without special moral was to help and comfort others as we are helped, that there should be a moral purpose by no moral.

The President thought an indirect moral purpose might render the story more attractive.

Mrs Graham [Elizabeth Turner Graham] wondered if the moral purpose is not higher when unconscious- the spiritual beyond the scientific!

Mrs Graham read “Thomas à Kempis”--a poem by Miss Reese [Lizette Woodworth Reese].

The President suggested that the various Committees study their subjects together, that we may have even better work than heretofore, and asked that word be sent to her when a paper is ready.

The President also announced that Miss Balch [Grace Balch] will give a paper on “George Eliot” at the next meeting.

Adjourned

Eliza Ridgely Secretary

 

Board Meeting--March 24th 1891.

Board of Management Meeting March 24th; On Constitutional clauses: Election new members, Old section 5; Old section 6; New section 5; New section 6; New section 7; Old section 7 moved to section 8; On “Literary Committee” removed; Birthday of Club last Tuesday in April suggested President; On publishing small book of some Club papers and poems; Suggested Committee of 5 for final judgement

A meeting of the Board of Management of the Woman’s Literary Club was held on Tuesday afternoon, March 24th, after 2.30 o’clock, with the President in the chair. Six members were present.

The Constitution was brought up, and the new Sections 5, 6, and 7 of IV on Elections were submitted to the Board by the Secretary, and approved. The old sections read as follows: Section 5--”The name and residence of every person proposed for membership together with the names of the proposer and seconder, shall be announced at the Club, at least two weeks before being acted upon by the Board.” Section 6--”The Board shall vote by ballot on each person so proposed, and such person shall be declared elected, unless two ballots are cast in the negative.” The new sections are: Section 5--”Proposed names of new members must be presented in writing to a member of the Board of Management with the names of those who propose and second the nomination, and the address of the proposed member. It must be stated whether such a person is willing to join the Club and able and ready to fulfill the required duties.” Section 6--”The Board shall vote by ballot on each person so proposed and such person shall be declared approved, unless two ballots are cast in the negative. The names of those approved shall be read to the Club the same day and the following Tuesday, and such persons shall then be considered elected.” Section 7--”The meetings of the Board for the approval of new members shall be held twice a year--on the first Tuesday in May and the first Tuesday in January, and those persons duly elected shall be admitted to full membership on the first Tuesday in October and the first Tuesday in February respectively.”

The old Section 7 on the classification of resident and non-resident members was moved to Section 8. Discussion on Article 3, Section 1 of the “Literary Committee.” Board decided to remove it from the Constitution, thus moving the next section [?etc.] from Section II to Section I [?etc.]

The President suggested that we keep the birthday of the Club on the last Tuesday in April.

Also that we select the best articles written by the Club during the winter, and publish a small book, with the best original poems read by the Club to lighten the book.

It was proposed that the members of the Club vote for the best articles and poems by means of slips, and that the final selection be made by a Committee of known literary ability perhaps.

Mrs Franklin [Christine Ladd-Franklin] suggested that this Committee consist of five members.

Adjourned.

Eliza Ridgely

Secretary

 

26th General Meeting--March 24th 1891

26th general meeting 861 Garden St. March 24th; Constitutional changes proposed; Motion--Franklin; Addition to Section 6 of Article IV; Suggestion President: Book of Club papers and poems; Discussion; Magazine of Club suggested; Historian perhaps; Club birthday; Motion on Constitutional clauses to be read “Salon” day; Paper--Balch read by Miller; On election of Board of Management; Motion--Franklin elect 2 officers “today”; Motion--Colvin Committee to investigate election methods; 2 members Executive Committee elected   

The twenty sixth general meeting of the Woman’s Literary Club was held at 861 Garden Street, on Tuesday afternoon, March 24th, at 3.30 o’clock, with the President in the chair. About 28 persons were present.

The minutes of the last meeting were read by the Secretary. The President presented to the Club for consideration certain proposed changes in the Constitution, namely: an addition to Section 6 of Article II; the omission of Section 1 of Article III on the Literary Committee; the substitution of Sections 5, 6, 7 of Article IV on Elections of new members for the old Sections 5 and 6; and the addition of Section 9 of Article IV on Honorary Membership.

Mrs Franklin [Christine Ladd-Franklin] moved that the following addition be made to Section 6 of Article IV, “Any member of the Club who has objections to the admission of such new members shall communicate them to some member of the Board of Management, and the Board shall then reconsider its action.”

The President suggested that a book be published during the coming summer, containing the best articles, with poems, read at the Club during the working season, that the choice of matter be made without favoritism on a literary basis, that the Club may mark the best papers in a printed list of all that may have been read “good, bad, or indifferent,” and that the final selection be given in charge to a special Committee.

Mrs Graham [Elizabeth Turner Graham] proposed to

postpone publishing until later, except one or two papers.

Mrs Whitelock [Louise Clarkson Whitelock] thought the Club could more certainly select the best papers if the list contained three divisions, marked “Approved”, “Not Approved”, and “Not heard”, as the attendance is uncertain.

Mrs Graham proposed a magazine of our own. Miss Thompson [Charlotte Dellacklot Thompson] asked if any provision had been made to keep the spoken thought of the Club.

The President hoped that the Club may have a historian; and suggested that the birthday of the Club be kept on the last Tuesday in April.

Miss Reese [Lizette Woodworth Reese] thought the Club rather young to publish. Mrs Franklin said “Not individually; that more depends on excellence of work than age of Club." Mrs Colvin [Mary Noyes Colvin] enquired about the expense of such a book. The President thought that would be partly covered by the members of the Club, many of whom would probably wish to have one or more copies. The motion passed to read the proposed clauses of the Constitution on the following Tuesday although a “Salon” day.

Mrs Miller read Miss Balch’s paper on “George Eliot”, speaking of her parentage and early life, contrasting her writings with those of Browning, and saying that she desired to advance woman educationally rather than politically.

Mrs Colvin enquired about the mode of electing members of the Board of Management.

The Secretary suggested the Crawford system of free nominations. Mrs Franklin moved that we elect two officers “today”, seconded by Mrs Stockbridge [Mrs. Henry Stockbridge]. Mrs Colvin moved that a Committee of one be appointed to investigate methods of election in use at Clubs and report two the W.L. Club on the first of April--seconded by Mrs Stockbridge. The Club then voted by ballot for two members of the Executive Committee, resulting in the election of Mrs Griffin [Rebecca Griffin] and Mrs Colvin.

Adjourned.

Eliza Ridgely

Secretary

 

Board Meeting--March 31st 1891.

Board of Management meeting 861 Garden St. March 31st; On renting house; On building; Election method; Suggested Crawford and Australian systems

A meeting of the Board of Management of the W.L.C. was held at 861 Garden Street on Tuesday afternoon, March 31st at 2.30 o’clock with the President in the chair. 7 members were present.

The President suggested that the Club rent a house on McMechen Street, let some of the rooms to lodgers, and have a reading room for the use of the neighborhood, not to be opened on Club days.

In speaking of building for ourselves, Mrs Colvin [Mary Noyes Colvin] and others thought some of the women’s societies in Baltimore might unite with us, and we might build a house centrally located that would suit the purposes of us all. Action deferred.[13]

Subject of method of election of officers was taken up, and the Secretary proposed that the nominations be on the Crawford plan--free to all the members of the Club--and the names be given in without signature on the Australian plan of secrecy. Secretary proposed that this be done by slips printed with the names of the offices, and followed by blanks; that these papers be mailed to each Club member that she may fill out and return her list of nominees unsigned; that on the day of election these same form(s) of blank lists may be at hand, and all nominees (so made by being named in two papers) shall be read aloud to the Club members, who may use the same blank slips for election. Plan rejected, as it was suggested that people should be willing to name their choice publicly, and that some might secretly nominate their own personal friends without regard to their fitness for the offices.

Adjourned.

Eliza Ridgely

Secretary

 

7th Salon--March 31st 1891.

7th Salon 861 Garden St. March 31st; Constitution amendments not voted upon--no quorum; Mrs Wolcott sketch of a A.W. conversation; Refreshments; Next [?week’s] subject

The seventh Salon of the Woman’s Literary Club was held at 861 Garden Street on Tuesday afternoon, March 31st, at 3.30 o’clock. There were about 17 members present.

The proposed amendments of the Constitution were not voted upon as there was no quorum.

Mrs Wolcott was the guest of the Club, and gave a sketch of the Society for the Advancement of Women[14] of which she is Treasurer.

After general conversation light refreshments were served.

The President announced the subject of the next meeting, and the Club adjourned.

Eliza Ridgely

Secretary

 

27th General Meeting--April 7th 1891.

27th general meeting 861 Garden Street April 7th; Mrs Wolcott; Changes in Constitution; Paper--Arbor Day; Miss S. Dorsey; Vote of thanks; Women’s Education, Mrs Colvin; “Modern Methods of Education”, Duer; Conversation on Educational [?subject]; Invitation to Kindergarten; Conversation on School Board etc.; Next program

The twenty seventh general meeting of the Woman’s Literary Club was held at 861 Garden Street, Tuesday afternoon, April 7th, at 3.30 o’clock with the President in the chair. About 49 persons were present, and among them Mrs Wolcott of Massachusetts. The minutes of the last two meetings were read by the Secretary. The addition of Section 6 to Article II of the Constitution, the rejection of Section 1 of Article III, and the adoption of Sections V, VI, and VII of Article IV, (and doubtless Section 9) were suggested to the Club through the President. One or two were passed by a rising vote and no further changes were made in the resolutions offered.

Miss S. W. Dorsey [Saffie Dorsey] read a paper on Arbor Day, hoping that it may be kept as a festival, and suggested that we plant especially the sycamour, cedar, willow and rose tree. Mrs Graham [Elizabeth Turner Graham] moved a special vote of thanks to Miss Dorsey in the name of the County members.

Mrs Colvin [Mary Noyes Colvin] gave a paper on “A few remarks on the Education of Women." She gave no plea for higher education as that has been proved proper, but the question is where and how to get it. It may be acquired in Colleges, but “how” is harder to answer. Shall she learn something about everything, or everything about something?--the first attainable in American, the second in German colleges. Shall she develop that broader character, or become the more conscientious student? Mrs Colvin gave [?two] personal illustrations of the latter course by describing her three years’ study in University of Zurich. From the four divisions of law, medicine, theology and philosophy she chose under the latter head, French(?), Italian, Provencal, etc. as a major, and Anglo-Saxon as a minor subject. Examination for a degree was very difficult, consisting of an original paper (she chose the examination of a 13th Century M.S.), one written at home for which 3 days were allowed, a written examination, and--most terrible of all--an oral examination. The last was of examinations in Latin, modern French, phonetic examinations in various languages. Mrs Colvin gained to her surprise a first degree, and her opinion is that European Colleges [not only teach by create science?], and that women may take a course in Johns Hopkins University or Bryn Mawr for general knowledge, than go abroad to study some special branch for three or four years.

Miss Edith Duer gave a talk on “Modern Methods of Education." The old idea was to teach facts--to instil the classics even with the rod--the new aim was “development” illustrated by reference to kindergarten teaching and to Mr Parker’s methods. Miss Duer had been asked by an educator why there was such a loss of interest in study in children between 8 or 10 and 16. Mrs Colvin thought [?(may be or many)] physical disadvantages, Mrs Franklin [Christine Ladd-Franklin] questioned if the methods of teaching were so good, Mrs Wolcott [thought?] too much distraction by other things, Miss Duer suggested dancing classes, Mrs Bullock gave want of fresh air, exercise, home training. Mrs Lake [Margaret Lake] gave invitation to Club to visit free Kindergarten. Mrs Stockbridge [Mrs. Henry Stockbridge] understood that men are willing to let women be upon School Board if women will come forward. Mrs Franklin thought that women should visit private schools, and serve upon public school boards.

President announced subject of next meeting, and Club adjourned.

Eliza Ridgely

Secretary

 

Board Meeting--April 14th 1891.

Board of Management 861 Garden Street April 14th; On Constitution; On Board Meeting; Vacancies in office?; Special meetings of Club; By Laws: President’s report; Non-resident guests of members; On admission of Residents of Baltimore to meetings.

 

A meeting of the Board of Management of the W.L.C. was held at 861 Garden Street on Tuesday afternoon, April 14th, at 2.30 o’clock.

The Treasurer was in the chair, and there were 7 members present.

The following resolutions were made. To leave out Sections [?4] of Article III of the Constitution; to add the following rule--”The Board shall have regular meetings as often as once in each month, and upon the request in writing of two of its members, the Secretary shall call a special meeting of the Board”; to add (to Article II--Section 7 on Vacancies in Office) to Article VI Section 3 on “Special Meetings of Club may be called by the President”--”and shall be called at any time on the written request of fifteen members of the Club”; to add the following By-Laws: “The President shall make a report to the Club at the annual Meeting." “Each member has the privilege of bringing a non-resident guest at any time." It was the sense of the meeting that residents of Baltimore might be admitted by invitation once or once a year to the Club meetings, and by Mrs Franklin’s [Christine Ladd-Franklin] suggestion, Mrs Lord [Alice Emma Sauerwein Lord] was made a Committee of one on Invitations for the remainder of the Club years. The Board also decided to have no more refreshments at the Social meetings and to strike the word “Salon” from the Constitution.

Adjourned.

Eliza Ridgely

Secretary

Minutes approved April 22nd.

 

28th General Meeting--April 14th 1891.

28th Meeting 861 Garden Street April 14th; “Utopia”--Early; “Talk on Education”, Stockbridge; Conversation on Education; Board of Lady Visitors suggested; Female Supervisors of Teachers; Parker system for Teachers; On Kindergarten; Two English “Literary Clubs”, Haman.

 

The twenty eighth general meeting of the Woman’s Literary Club was held at 861 Garden Street, on Tuesday afternoon, April 14th at 3.30 o’clock.

In the absence of the President, the second Vice-President was in the Chair. There were about 35 members present.

The Presiding Officer read Mrs Early’s [Maud Graham Early] paper on “Utopia." Its supposed inhabitants believe in the immortality of the soul; there is compulsory education, perfect equality, and no capital punishment, the women may be priests as well as the men; and gold is despised.

Mrs Stockbridge [Mrs. Henry Stockbridge] gave a Talk on Education, calling attention especially to the public schools which not only have no room for the forty five percent of children that should attend, but are crammed with the remaining fifty five percent and not properly ventilated. Kentucky and Missouri have the best teachers.

In reply to Mrs Franklin [Christine Ladd-Franklin], who enquired if Mrs Stockbridge could suggest a remedy, the latter thought there might be a Board of Lady Visitors for the public schools, and better training of the teachers.

Miss Szold [Henrietta Szold] said there had been female supervisors of teachers in Philadelphia.

Miss Duer [Edith Duer] thought the Parker system would train teachers to train pupils.

Mrs Stockbridge said Mrs Silvia Eastman had seen no fine scholars come through the Kindergarten; that the child should learn by effort.

Mrs Griffin [Rebecca Griffin] thought there might be loss of independence by Kindergartens, and Miss Reese [Lizette Woodworth Reese]--loss of imagination.

Miss Duer thought the success of the Kindergarten depends on the teacher as it means development--also that it teaches loss of self-consciousness.

Mrs Haman [Louise C. Haman] read a paper on “Two English Literary Clubs”--the “Apollo Club” of Elizabeth’s time founded by Ben Jonson...and the “Literary Club” of two hundred years later of which Dr Samuel Johnson was the central figure.

Meeting adjourned.

Eliza Ridgely

Secretary

 

Board Meeting--April 17th 1891.

Meeting Board of Management, Mrs Alan Smith’s April 17th; No tea--April 28th; A piano; By-Law on Residents of City as invited guests; Minutes of Board to be read and acted upon; On elections

 An adjourned meeting of the Board of Management was held at the residence of Mrs Alan Smith [May (?) Smith], 24 West Franklin Street, on Friday afternoon, April 17th, at 4 o’clock, with the second Vice-President in the Chair, and four members present.

By request of the Vice-President, it was decided to have no tea served on April 28th, and to hire a piano for that afternoon.

The following By-Law was passed: “Members wishing to invite residents of the City as guests may obtain invitations by application to the Committee of Invitations. The number of such guests at any one meeting shall be limited to ten, and no resident of the City may be invited more than once during the season.”

By request of the Secretary, the following rule was made: “At each meeting of the Board of Management the minutes of the last meeting of the Board shall be read by the Secretary, and acted upon by the Board.”

After unsettled discussion on the annual elections--whether a nominating Committee should be appointed by the Club, the meeting adjourned.

Eliza Ridgely

Secretary

Approved April 22nd

 

29th General Meeting--April 21st 1891.

29th general meeting 861 Garden St. April 21st; Memorial Day, Shakespeare; Shakespeare sketch, Goddard; Selection from “Two Gentlemen of Verona” was acted by Mrs Colvin and Miss Gibbs.

Mrs Lord [Alice Emma Sauerwein Lord] read a poem entitled “A Reverie at Stratford on Avon."

Mrs Wilmer [Mrs. G. J. Wilmer] gave as recitations a part of the Courtship of Catharine from “Henry V”, and a portion of the trial scene in “The Merchant of Venice."

Mrs Whitelock [Louise Clarkson Whitelock] and Mrs Latimer [Elizabeth Wormeley Latimer] read papers on “Hamlet, according to the New School of Dramatic Art”, and “King Lear and his Daughters."

Mrs Franklin [Christine Ladd-Franklin] moved that the meeting be adjourned, seconded by Mrs Graham [Elizabeth Turner Graham].

Adjourned.

Eliza Ridgely

Secretary

Adopted.

 

Board Meeting--April 22nd 1891.

Meeting of Board of Management 4 East Madison St. April 22nd.; On “Special Meeting of Club”; On meeting Board of Management; By-Law on mode of election; On “Nominating Committee”; On question of Presiding Officer for Election Day; On mode of election; Majority vote; Motion on Paper of Instruction for Chairman

 

A meeting of the Board of Management was held at 4 East Madison Street, April 22nd, 1891, with the second Vice-President in the Chair, and 7 members present.

Minutes of the last two meetings of the Board of Management were read by the Secretary, corrected and approved by the Board.

Article 6, Section 3 allowing a special meeting of the Club to be called by fifteen members, was by suggestion of Mrs Stockbridge [Mrs. Henry Stockbridge], and by vote, changed to permit such a meeting to be called by ten members. Discussion whether two or three members of Board of Management should have the power to call a meeting of the Board resulted in favor of leaving this power with any two members, and Section 1 of Article III was amended so as to read “The Board shall have regular meetings as often as once in each month during the season, and upon the request of the President or any two of its members, the Secretary shall call a special meeting of the Board."

The following resolution put by Mrs Franklin [Christine Ladd-Franklin] was finally passed as a By-Law: “At the meeting for the election of officers, nominations may be made by members of the Club. The six members of the Executive Committee shall be separately voted for."

The question was discussed whether the Club should nominate for each office discreetly, or should choose a Nominating Committee, which Committee it was suggested should consist of three--Mrs Stockbridge thought there should be five members--but the Board seemed finally in favor of three. Mrs Colvin [Mary Noyes Colvin] moved that the question of having a nominating Committee be presented to the Club for its decision, and was seconded by Mrs Stockbridge. Mrs Colvin moved that this be presented by to the President or Vice-President at the next meeting. On discussion, it was suggested that the Club might choose some of its best members for this Committee--thus practically debarring them from election; after which discussion, Mrs Colvin re-considered her motion to present the disputed question to the Club, and was seconded by Mrs Franklin who then moved to lay the motion on the table--seconded by Mrs Colvin who thought this best at present. Passed. Mrs Colvin thought it might be unnecessary to nominate if the Club elected by ballot.

Mrs Franklin did not agree.

Question discussed whether the meeting for election should be presided over by the President of by a temporary Chairman. The majority thought the latter was the general custom.

Suggested that at the election meeting, nominations can be called for, but yet each one can vote for her own candidate; that after the first voting all the lists be read; that there should be two tellers; and the Chairman should announce the result.

The sense of the meeting was that the elections should be by majority, not by plurality.

Mrs Colvin moved that one of the Committee draw up a paper stating details given, and if approved by the Board, instruct by this the Chairman for election day. Mrs Colvin moved that Mrs Franklin write the paper. Mrs Franklin declined as being too busy.

Finally decided that Miss Haughton [Louisa Courtland Osburne Haughton] should write it out, and compare it with the Secretary’s accounts.

Mrs Franklin resigned from the Committee on the Printing of the Constitution. Mrs Griffin [Rebecca Griffin] named Mrs Colvin, seconded by Mrs Goddard [Li Goddard], Mrs Alan Smith [May (?) Smith] was named by Mrs Stockbridge, seconded by Mrs Franklin. It was suggested that the Committee consist of three--which was decided upon.

Color of cover to Constitution discussed, and referred to Committee. Mrs Franklin asked if she were authorized to pay for Miss Milnor’s [Mary Worthington Milnor] scrap book for Committee. No dissent.

The Second Vice-President presented form to be printed for invitations to residents of Baltimore in pursuance of By-Law 3.

Adjourned.

Eliza Ridgely.

Approved.

 

30th General Meeting--April 28th 1891.

30th meeting[15] 861 Garden St. April 28th; “Lady Suffolk” Atkinson; “Usefulness of Fellowships” Franklin; Conversation; Discussion on showing special honor to college resident graduates, etc

 The thirtieth general meeting of the Woman’s Literary Club was held at 861 Garden Street, on Tuesday afternoon, April 28th, at 3.30 o’clock, with the second Vice-President in the Chair.

There were about 32 persons present.

The minutes of the last meeting were read by the Secretary.

Mrs Atkinson [Mrs. Robert Atkinson] gave an article on “Lady Suffolk”, who was once Catherine of Ellerslie, born 1518. Mrs Franklin [Christine Ladd-Franklin] read a paper on “The Usefulness of Fellowships”, and said in the essay and in reply to questions, that a plan had been made by the woman’s association of Collegiate alumnae to collect a fund for an European fellowship, to be bestowed upon some young woman who must be a college graduate, but not necessarily a specialist. This fund is to be at least $500 a year, and subscriptions are desired. The fellowship is only given for one year to any person, unless in cases of extreme brilliancy when it might be given for three years. These graduates are to be found by means of circulars sent to all graduating colleges.

During the general conversation, in speaking of women college graduates, Mrs Bullock [Caroline Canfield Bullock] thought there are some in Baltimore leading lonely lives, and Mrs Sioussat [Annie Leakin Sioussat] suggested that it would be well to keep a list of such persons that members of the Club who might, as individuals, wish to call upon them, could do so.

Mrs Haman [Louise C. Haman] thought this too public a method. Mrs Graham  [Elizabeth Turner Graham] suggested that some one hunt them out. Mrs Bullock--that we wait.

Mrs Graham moved that a Committee of three be named with Mrs Franklin Chairman--to find out these persons that we may show them honor. Mrs Franklin declined Chairmanship, and Mrs Graham named Mrs Stockbridge [Mrs. Henry Stockbridge].

Mrs Franklin moved that the Chair appoint Chairman of this Committee, and finally moved that the Club consider the subject for 7 minutes, seconded by Mrs Lake [Margaret Lake]. Motion adopted.

When the Club was called to order by the Presiding Officer, Mrs Franklin moved that “it is true sentiment of the Club that as individuals we show more hospitality to intellectual strangers, but take no action as a Club."

This motion was finally passed, and the Club adjourned.

Eliza Ridgely

Secretary

Adopted.

 

Board Meeting--May 5th 1891.

Meeting Board of Management 861 Garden St. May 5th; Election of new members; Non-resident members; Section on By-Laws to Mrs Stockbridge; Club shall have voice in By-Laws; On Treasurer’s reports--days; Elections report postponed

 The meeting of the Board of Management (W.L.C.) for the election of new members took place at 861 Garden Street, May 5th, before the Club meeting. Quorum present. The following new members were elected: Miss Bainbridge, Miss Anna Cole [Anna Lewis Cole], Miss Leila Gittings, Miss Margaret Briscoe [Margaret Sutton Briscoe]. Later Miss Bennett [Sarah H. Bennett] was voted in also. Miss Albert Doughty was made a non-resident member. Honorary membership not conferred on two applicants presented, as the Board knew nothing of them.

The Section in Constitution on By-Laws was given to Mrs Stockbridge [Mrs. Henry Stockbridge] for amendment, as it was sense of Board that the Club shall have a voice in the By-Laws. Section of Constitution on Treasurer’s report also given might be appointed for the reports.

Miss Haughton [Louisa Courtland Osburne Haughton] postponed report on elections.

Adjourned.

Eliza Ridgely

Secretary.

Approved(?)

 

8th Social Meeting--May 5th 1891.

8th Social Meeting 861 Garden St. May 5th; Proposed change in making of By-Laws and on article of Treasurer’s duties; Names of proposed members read; Lines--Stockbridge; President’s address read by Mrs Griffin; Resolutions of thanks to President and sympathy; Musical program 

The eighth social meeting--W.L.C.--was held at 861 Garden Street, on Tuesday afternoon, May 5th, at 3.30 o’clock with the 2nd Vice President in the chair, and about 40 persons present.

Secretary read minutes of last general meeting. Mrs Stockbridge [Mrs. Henry Stockbridge] read a proposed change in the article on the making of By-Laws and an addition to the article on Treasurer’s duties (2 of Section 6.) to the Club for its consideration.

Mrs Colvin [Mary Noyes Colvin] called attention of the Club to the necessity to be present the following Tuesday to vote on the plan of election that should be suggested.

Names of proposed new members read by Secretary. Mrs Stockbridge gave some lines on a Visit of Stedman to Chicago.

The President’s address was read by Mrs Griffin [Rebecca Griffin] to the Club. It spoke of the broad views of the Club and dwelt especially upon the value of Committees, calling attention also to the scrap books--and also the book to be kept for “Club History."[16]

Resolutions of thanks to an sympathy with the President suggested by Mrs Griffin and passed by Club, and Secretary was requested to inform President of the same.

A duett was then given by Mrs Sioussat [Annie Leakin Sioussat] and Miss Leakin [M. Leakin] with piano accompaniment. “He shall feed his flock like a shepherd”--Mrs Lord [Alice Emma Sauerwein Lord]--Miss [or Mrs] Evans--accompaniment.

“A Lullaby” by Mrs Yardley [Alice Yardley]--contralto, Miss Evans [May Garretson Evans] --violin, Mrs(?) Evans [Mrs. Henry C. Evans] accompaniment. “Largo” by Handel(?)--Miss Evans violin, Mrs Evans accompaniment. “Berceuse” Mrs Haman [Louise C. Haman]--contralto; “Loin du Bal” Gillet and “Rural Wedding March--Miss Evans, violins, Miss Evans violoncello, Mrs Evans--accompaniment--”Dearest Heart, Farewell” Strelezki--Mrs Yardley--contralto. Moonlight--Robert--Mrs Lord.

Eliza Ridgely

Secretary.

Adopted.

 

Board Meeting--May 12th 1891.

Meeting of Board of Management 861 Garden St. May 12th; Those in office may attend elections; Chairman of elections to be voted by Club

 

Informal meeting of Board, May (12th) 13th at 861 Garden Street, before meeting of Club. Second Vice President presiding. President’s suggestion that those in office might be present at elections quite in accord with feeling of Board.

Chairman of election to be voted upon by Club, etc.

Adjourned.

Eliza Ridgely

Secretary.

Approved.

 

31st General Meeting--May 12th 1891.

31st general meeting 861 Garden St. May 12th; Alterations made in Constitution on By-Laws and Treasurer’s Report; Names new members read and 2nd time; Plan of election day; Committee on Authors and Artists of Maryland; Paper--Mrs A. Smith “Maryland’s Natural Resources for Cultureand Art."; Paper--Milnor “Earliest Maryland Writings."’ Paper--Atkinson “Charles Wilson Peel”; Article--Tait on Maryland artists.; Easter--poem “A Summer Blow."

The thirty first general meeting of the Woman’s Literary Club was held at 861 Garden Street, Tuesday afternoon May 12th, with the second Vice President in the chair. There were about 32 persons present. Minutes of last meeting were read by Secretary.

Alterations in Sections of Constitution on By-Laws, and Treasurer’s Report read by Mrs Stockbridge [Mrs. Henry Stockbridge] and passed by Club.

Names of new members read by Secretary for the second time, and the plan of election day was read by second Vice President.

The literary work of the day was in charge of Mrs Alan Smith [May (?) Smith], Chairman of the Committee of “Authors and Artists of Maryland."

A paper was read by Mrs Smith on “Maryland’s Natural Resources for Culture and Art”, speaking of the antiquity of the state, its numerous resources, among which are its useful marbles.

Miss Milnor [Mary Worthington Milnor] read an article called “Earliest Maryland Writings”--the first publication in 1596--the most ancient Maryland document in 1633--the Calvert papers--the writings of Frederick Calvert--Reverend William McSherry--Father White--George Alsopp--etc.

Mrs Robert Atkinson’s paper was on “Charles Wilson Peel” who was taught by [?Heselins], and painted beautiful miniatures. Mrs Tait’s [Anna Dolores Tiernan Tait] article called attention to many Maryland artists--to Anna(?) Peel, Charles Boyle, Alfred J. Miller a pupil of Sully, R.C. Woodville, and the great sculptor William Rinehart.

Mrs Easter [Marguerite E. Easter] read a poem called “A Summer Blow." Mrs Smith called attention to various portraits, etc., that had been brought to the Club to illustrate the subject of the day.

Adjourned.

Eliza Ridgely

Secretary.

 

Annual Business Meeting--May 19th 1891.

Annual meeting 861 Garden St. May 19th; Treasurer’s report read.; Club named a Chairman; Tellers appointed by Chair of day; Nominations by Club; Mrs Turnbull elected President; Mrs Griffin 1st Vice; All votes read; Miss Haughton 2nd Vice President; Miss Ridgely--Secretary; Treasurer elected; Executive Committee chosen

The annual business meeting [?(opened at)] 861 Garden Street, May 19th--3 o’clock. With the President in chair.

The Secretary gave minutes of last meeting, and the Treasurer read a report of the finances of the Club.

The President asked the Club to name a Chairman, and Mrs Griffin [Rebecca Griffin] was elected.

Eliza Ridgely

Secretary

Mrs Griffin, on taking the chair appointed Miss Schröeder [Olga M. Schröeder] and Miss Brown [Mary Wilcox Brown], tellers, and the business of balloting for officers was begun--

Nominations for office were made by the Club.

Mrs Turnbull [Francese Litchfield Turnbull] was nominated for President--no other name was proposed--the ballot was taken and Mrs Turnbull was elected by unanimous vote.

The next ballot was for 1st Vice President. Five nominations were made. The Chairman read the number of votes which each lady received. Mrs Griffin has the majority vote.

The third ballot was for 2nd Vice President. The names were read, and Miss Haughton [Louisa Courtland Osburne Haughton] received the majority vote.

The next nomination was for Secretary and Miss Ridgely was elected.

Nominations were then made for treasurer--on the 2nd ballot, Miss Charlotte Thompson [Charlotte Dellacklot Thompson] was declared elected.

In order to save time, it was proposed by Mrs Turnbull that the choice for the six officers of the executive committee be made at one time--Some twenty names were proposed and the 1st ballot gave a majority of votes to Mrs Colvin [Mary Noyes Colvin], Mrs Lord [Alice Emma Sauerwein Lord], Mrs Sioussat [Annie Leakin Sioussat] and Miss Crane [Lydia Crane].

Voting was continued until a majority vote could be obtained for the two other members of the Committee.

After three ballots, this resulted in the election of Miss Szold [Henrietta Szold], and Miss Brown. The meeting closed.

 

Board Meeting--May 21st 1891.

Meeting Board of Management 1530 Park Avenue May 21st 1891; List of Committees; Special days for Committees suggested; on selection of Club [?rooms].; On Constitution; On Constitution; Board meetings; 5 Residents of City on to be admitted to any Club meetings; Treasurer’s accounts

A meeting of the Board of Management of W.L.C. elected May 19th, was held at 1530 Park Avenue, May 21st 1891 about 11 o’clock, with the President in the chair and 7 members present.

The President brought up subjects of Committees and the former list was somewhat altered. “Current Criticism” was added--this Committee to notice books of the passing hour; Poetry was divided into three parts: “Modern Poetry” Chairman Miss Reese [Lizette Woodworth Reese]; and by Mrs Griffin’s [Rebecca Griffin] suggestion, the other divisions were called “Classic Poetry” and “Mediaeval Poetry."

The Secretary suggested that especial days for Committees should be named beforehand. The President thought better not as yet. Miss Charlotte Thompson [Charlotte Dellacklot Thompson] suggested a Committee on the “History of Maryland."

The President proposed that for next winter the Club should rent the “Sun Parlor” of the Altamont Hotel at five dollars for each meeting, twenty dollars for each social meeting--the last sum to include refreshments. This it was decided to do, if upon enquiry, the heating arrangements should be found adequate.

The President also hoped that the Club may some day have rooms in the proposed Art Club, and mentioned kind offers of rooms made to W.L.C.--one of which was by the Academy of Sciences through Mrs Sioussat [Annie Leakin Sioussat]. The minutes of three meetings of the Board of Management on April 22nd, May 5th, and May 13th read by Secretary and approved by Board.

Enquiry by President on Section 3 of Article VI. of Constitution mentioned in minutes of April 22nd showed that some amendments had not apparently been presented to the Club for approval.

Secretary gave as the reason, that one of those present at the early meetings had looked upon them as “clerical omissions” as they formed part of the University Club Constitution by which the Woman’s Literary Club Constitution had been framed.[17]

The President thought this insufficient, as some parts of the University Club Constitution had not been used.

The Section named, and others not voted upon by the Club were for this cause declared unconstitutional, and as the majority of the Board did not wish to continue the added clause in Section 3. Article VI. and the Section 1 of Article III. on “Board Meetings”, it was decided to erase them from the Constitution.

The four By-Laws were read, and number 3 was changed by vote so that only five residents of Baltimore instead of ten may be admitted as guests to any one Club meeting.

The Treasurer asked who should keep the accounts when filed. The President thought the Treasurer should take charge of them.

Adjourned.

Eliza Ridgely

Secretary.

Approved.

 

9th Social Meeting--May 26th 1891.

9th Social meeting 861 Garden St. May 26th; Papers read; Dammann on “Geo. H. Miles”; Ridgely on “Peace”; Photo honorary member

The ninth Social meeting of the Woman’s Literary Club was held at 861 Garden Street on Tuesday afternoon, May 26th, at 3.30 o’clock with the President in the chair.

There were about 25 persons present.

On account of the approaching end of the season, papers were read as at the usual meetings.

Minutes of the annual meeting were read by the Secretary. The first paper was by Mrs Dammann [Aileen B. C. Dammann] on George H. Miles a critic and poet of Baltimore, speaking of his life and works, and describing his essay on Hamlet as a convincing treatise. The poet’s wife has still some of his unpublished manuscripts.

The second paper was by Miss Ridgely [Eliza Ridgely] on “Peace--a Question of Many Days”, contrasting various methods of securing individual and international Peace.

The President called attention of the Club to the Committees for the coming year, and asked the members to be present the following week when the plan would probably be more fully settled.

Also announced that a photograph had been received from an honorary member--Miss McConkey [Miss McCoukey].

Adjourned.

Eliza Ridgely

Secretary.

 

32nd General Meeting--June 2nd 1891.

32nd general meeting Lehmann’s Hall. June 2nd 1891.; New committee lists given out; Club scrap books; President’s farewell address; Sioussat on “Colonial Women”; Graham--”Mary of Magdala,” read by Carter; Richardson’s note; Congratulations to Dr Hall on her wedding.

The thirty second general meeting of the Woman’s Literary Club was held on the platform of Lehmann’s Hall, June 2nd 1891, 3.30 o’clock, with the President in the chair.

There were about 36 persons present.

The second Vice President distributed the new lists containing the names of Committees and Chairmen for the coming season.

Mrs Whitelock [Louise Clarkson Whitelock] commented on ‘the’ absence of ‘a’ Committee on “Art." The President thought this subject could be brought in under some other Committee.

Attention was called to the various Club scrap books, and the announcement made of Dr Alice T. Hall’s [Alice T. Hall Chapman] approaching marriage.

The President in her farewell address for the summer hoped that the Club might be provided with better rooms the coming winter.

Mrs Sioussat [Annie Leakin Sioussat] read a paper on Colonial women, mentioning among others, Margaret and Mary Brent distinguished in St Mary’s--formerly St Thomas’--County. A vote of thanks to the President was proposed, and passed by ‘the’ Club.

As the President was obliged to leave, the first Vice President took the chair for the remainder of the meeting.

Mrs Graham’s [Elizabeth Turner Graham] poem “Mary of Magdala, otherwise known as Mary Magdalene” was read by Miss Carter [Sally K. Carter], for which the Club desired that Miss Carter would express its appreciation to Mrs Graham who was absent.

A vote from Mrs Richardson [Hester Crawford Dorsey Richardson] was read by ‘the’ Secretary. It was proposed that the congratulations of the Club be sent to Dr. Alice T. Hall on her wedding day.

Miss Duer [Edith Duer] suggested that the message be forwarded by telegram, which was decided upon.

Adjourned.

Eliza Ridgely

Secretary

 

Resolutions of Regret on the Death of Mrs Mary Spear Tiernan

January 13th 1891.

In the bright hours of the New Year that has come to us so full of hope and promise, we are called to stand still and hushed, in the presence of that great power which holds in its hand and guides into the “silent land” so much that is precious, so much that once made the beauty and gladness of life. To-day, only a short time before the hour appointed for the assembling of the Club came the unexpected and sad tidings of the going away from our midst of Mrs Mary Spear Tiernan, one of the founders of the Woman’s Literary Club--one of its brightest members--one most suggestive and original in modes of thought, most alert to all that might advance the interests of our Association.

At one o’clock this morning, after an illness of brief duration, she passed into the thitherland, that, in the glory of an eternal morn, lies beyond human vision.

Our loss is indeed grievous and carries sorrow to every member of the Club who knew her only as a spirited writer, a ready speaker, quick and interesting in argument, courteous and friendly to her co-workers.

But to those, who in the close association of years, held knowledge of her aspirations, her earnest endeavors for excellence, her fund of humor and genial nature, the loss of Mrs Tiernan is indeed a bereavement--a regret keen and enduring.

She has gone in the fullness of her powers, but as we feel sure, not before her work was finished--She has gone--and in the long days when she shall walk no more among us, all kindly and gentle memories will cluster about her name, which today and tomorrow, as time moves on, will be to us as a sweet song that is sung, as a chord lost from life’s harmonies, as a ray of light gathered back to its source--for “Death is not death--what seems so, is transition."

(This quotation from Longfellow was suggested by Mrs Graham [Elizabeth Turner Graham] as resolution, and so adopted.)

Resolutions of Regret on the Death of Mrs Ann Mary Coleman (Mrs Chapman Coleman)

1891.

A Committee of the Woman’s Club of Baltimore consisting of Mrs Atkinson [Mrs. Robert Atkinson], Mrs Bullock [Caroline Canfield Bullock], Miss Zacharias [Jane Zacharias] and Mrs Franklin [Christine Ladd-Franklin], having been appointed to take action upon the death of Mrs Ann Mary Coleman, drew up the following resolutions:--

Whereas: A notice of the death of Mrs Ann Mary Coleman, a member of the Woman’s Literary Club of Baltimore, forwarded to us from Louisville, Kentucky, occasions us deep sorrow and regret;

And whereas: Mrs Coleman was well and most appreciatively known and valued in Baltimore, and those of us whose privilege it was to be among her friends has frequent opportunity to witness the noble traits of her character as well as to admire her remarkable and vigorous intellect;

Resolved: that we sincerely regret her death, and that we would convey to her bereaved family our sympathy for their inestimable loss and our hope for their consolation through the evidence of the strong faith which characterized her life.

Resolved: that a copy of these resolutions be forwarded to the family of our lamented friend, Mrs Ann Mary Coleman.

[END OF SEASON]  



[1] “Jennie June” was the pseudonym of Jane Cunningham Croly (1829-1901), one of the U.S.’s first female syndicated news columnists and founder of the first woman’s club, Sorosis, in New York City in 1869 and the General Federation of Woman’s Clubs in 1890. Miriam Florence Squier Leslie (1836-1914), better known as Mrs. Frank Leslie, was the editor of Frank Leslie’s Lady’s Magazine before marrying the magazine’s publisher, Frank Leslie. After Leslie died in 1880, Mrs. Leslie legally changed her name to Mrs. Frank Leslie and took over her husband’s numerous publications, turning them into immensely profitable concerns. A lavish entertainer and flamboyant celebrity figure, Leslie espoused suffrage and willed her fortune to suffrage activist Carrie Chapman Catt.

[2] A copy of the Club’s original constitution has not been located. The constitution ratified in 1893-1894 was published as a pamphlet that is included in the Maryland Historical Society collection and transcribed on the Aperio website. <INCLUDE URL/LINK>

[3] Pro tempore, for the moment; i.e., interim or temporary.

[4] The Woman’s Christian Temperance Union.

[5] This last line is added before the Meeting adjourned part, but is indicated by an arrow

[6] Adjourned is written before member’s names read, but is indicated to go after with an arrow

[7] Nominated by is indicated by “ “ indicating repetition of phrasing

[8] Inserted scribbling “names read?” in tiny print

[9] No notes on this page other than the title

[10] At once is underlined for emphasis

[11] A “Miss H. P. Woods” is listed in the membership books.

[12] Underlined for emphasis

[13] The Roland Park Woman's Club did exactly this in the early twentieth century. The house still stands at the southwest corner of Cold Spring Lane and Roland Avenue, and the Club still meets there today.

[14] Should footnote this.

[15] Illegible note written in above “meeting.”

[16] MDHS has the scrapbook (or scrapbooks?) for the WLCB-- does this box also have a book containing club history?

[17] This sentence seems to indicate that the WLCB’s constitution was based, in part, on the University Club constitution—possibly referring to Johns Hopkins University.